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Transitions of expertise

Decades of previous research have conceptualized the development of expertise as a vertical development from novice to expert. However, expertise development is not always a linear bottom-to-top movement; it also involves side steps. These horizontal side steps are significant in dynamic, technology-rich domains, where changes in the context drive changes in the individual. As a contribution to analysing the development of expertise in dynamic compared with stable contexts, this chapter introduces a distinction between horizontal and vertical transitions of expertise that can be used to describe individual and institutional change in technology-mediated learning and working environments. Vertical transitions occur when individuals, technologies, or domains develop within stable and fixed conditions. Horizontal transitions occur when individuals, technologies, or domains mature in the synergy with other fields. The analytical implications are illustrated with some significant studies in the domain of medical image diagnosis. Finally, [the author discusses] relations to other domains beyond medicine and outlines directions for future research to examine empirically differential horizontal and vertical transitions of expertise in technology-rich domains.

Decades of previous research have conceptualized the development of expertise as a vertical development from novice to ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Gegenfurtner, Andreas
Date: 2013
Resource type: Book chapter
Series name: Research in vocational education
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Technology; Teaching and learning;

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Australian industry report

The 'Australian industry report' is a new initiative of the Department of Industry's Office of the Chief Economist. The report provides an overview and analysis of the major economic factors affecting Australia's industries, with a focus on sectors that reflect a mix of the comparative advantage in natural resources and strengths in human capital and innovation. These sectors are: food and agribusiness; mining equipment, technology and services; oil, gas and energy resources; advanced manufacturing; and medical technologies and pharmaceuticals. As technological progress continues to accelerate, it will have an impact on the demand for skills. There is considerable debate on which workers are most at risk of being displaced by technology. Views range from seeing technology as factor-neutral (benefiting all workers equally), to seeing technology as skill-biased (where an occupation's skill level is a significant indicator in determining how susceptible it is to automotive technologies). The challenges presented by more automation are not limited to low-skilled positions, as robots are increasingly replicating the tasks of medium and high-skilled workers. The comparative advantages of being human - the ability to solve problems intuitively, improvise spontaneously and act creatively - as well as the unlimited needs and wants of humans suggest that the displacement of jobs due to automation is unlikely to be long term. Automation will allow for new technologies to develop and allow workers to utilise those comparative advantages in ways that are currently unimaginable. Australian industries are well placed to adapt to the changing circumstances. Productivity is expected to pick up as the economy transitions to the production phase of the mining sector. Labour market conditions are softening, but due to flexibility in the labour market, this has had the upshot (for businesses) of reducing real wages and skills shortages.

The 'Australian industry report' is a new initiative of the Department of Industry's Office of the Chief Economist. The ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Department of Industry. Office of the Chief Economist
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Economics; Industry; Skills and knowledge;

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The challenges in providing needed transition programming to juvenile offenders

The transition to and from juvenile justice settings is a complex and challenging process. Effectively preparing juvenile justice personnel to address the transition needs of incarcerated students is an essential aspect of reducing the negative effects of the school-to-prison pipeline. This article examines program and professional development challenges that should be addressed to provide effective juvenile justice transition services. It also provides a technology-based perspective to the professional development challenges that are inherent within juvenile justice.

The transition to and from juvenile justice settings is a complex and challenging process. Effectively preparing juvenile ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Platt, John S.; Bohac, Paul D.; Wade, Wendy
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Journal title: Journal of correctional education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Youth; Disadvantaged; Workforce development;

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Summer nudging: can personalized text messages and peer mentor outreach increase college going among low-income high school graduates?

Over the last several years researchers have devoted increased attention to how students' and parents' behavioral responses to complex information and complicated processes in education may contribute to persistent inequalities in access and achievement. Several recent low-cost interventions demonstrate that simplifying information about college and financial aid and helping students access professional assistance can generate substantial improvements in students' postsecondary outcomes. [The authors] build on this growing literature by investigating the impact of two applications of behavioral principles to mitigate summer 'melt,' the phenomenon that college-intending high school graduates fail to matriculate in college anywhere in the year following high school. One intervention utilized an automated and personalized text messaging campaign to remind students of required pre-matriculation tasks and to connect them to counselor-based support. Another employed near-aged peer mentors to provide summer outreach and support to college-intending students. The interventions substantially increased college enrollment among students who had less academic-year access to quality college counseling or information. Both strategies are cost-effective approaches to increase college entry among populations traditionally underrepresented in higher education, and more broadly, highlight the potential for low-cost behavioral nudges and interventions to achieve meaningful improvements in students' educational outcomes.

Over the last several years researchers have devoted increased attention to how students' and parents' behavioral responses ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Castleman, Benjamin L.; Page, Lindsay C.
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: EdPolicyWorks working paper series
Subjects: Students; Technology; Participation;

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Big data analytics: assessment of demand for labour and skills 2013-2020

This report has been produced by e-skills UK, the sector skills council for business and information technology (IT) on behalf of SAS UK, an independent vendor of business analytics software and services. The report aims to provide an understanding of the developing demand trends for big data (there is currently no single, internationally recognised definition of 'big data') related staff in the UK, focusing in particular on demand arising within the IT function of UK businesses. The report is based on an analysis of recruitment advertising data and bespoke forecasts of information technology and telecommunications employment and big data demand for the coming five years. The most commonly advertised roles for big data staff in the UK in the third quarter of 2012 were: developers (42 per cent of advertised positions), architects (10 per cent), analysts (eight per cent) and administrators (six per cent).

This report has been produced by e-skills UK, the sector skills council for business and information technology (IT) on ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: E-skills UK (Firm)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Report
Series name: Big data analytics
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Technology; Labour market;

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What did we flip?: exploiting technology for students to develop real-world perspectives in the classroom

Many higher education institutions have implemented flipped classroom models for improving student engagement in the learning process. In this paper [the authors] present the experiment 'Village Pharmacy', which uses technology assisted case-based approaches for students to learn pharmaceutics and associated professional skills in context. Using an auto-ethnographic approach [the authors] collected and analysed [their] experiences of designing and teaching this course, reflected on peer feedback, student learning experiences and responses. [The authors] present [their] design, reflection and analysis of how learning unfolded in a flipped classroom and the lessons [the authors] have learnt to make improvements for the future. [The authors] believe that [the] reflections will be useful for academics wishing to use technology to flip the classroom for students to develop key professional skills inherent to their discipline.

Many higher education institutions have implemented flipped classroom models for improving student engagement in the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Krishnan, Siva; Schneider, Jennifer; Munro, Irene
Conference name: HERDSA Annual International Conference
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Conference
Series name: Research and development in higher education
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Higher education; Students;

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Fine print, vol. 37, no. 3, 2014

This issue of 'Fine print' contains the following feature articles: 'Ingenious A-frame programs' by Lynda Achren (pages 3-7) which is a collection of five snapshots of successful local pre-accredited programs; 'A finer grained assessment approach' by Michael Christie and Jennifer Dunbabib (pages 8-12) which provides an overview of an approach that is gaining traction as part of the Tasmanian Adult Literacy Action Plan; and 'Social learning: resource platforms and the dynamics of 'push' and 'pull'' by Colin Lankshear (pages 13-17) which explores innovative approaches to learning and some of the theory behind developments in online learning. This issue also contains: 'Higher order thinking skills and the adult learner' by Rhonda Raisbeck (pages 18-20) which explores a themed approach that integrates higher order thinking skills; 'Mathematising' by Beth Marr (pages 21-22) which considers the nexus between mathematics and numeracy teaching; 'Ethical dimensions' by Tricia Bowen (pages 23-24) which explores philosophical theories in relation to teaching; 'Pride of place shines through' by Sarah Deasey (pages 25-26) which provides a rundown of the 2014 Learn Local awards; 'Stories from the field' by Louise Wignall (pages 26-27) which highlights the power of story; 'ACFE Flagship project' by Veronica Volkoff and Rosemary Sharman (pages 28-30) which reports on an adult, community and further education action research project; 'Seven stories, the last not ended' by John Aitchison (pages 31-33) which provides an overview of South Africa's struggles with adult literacy and basic education; and 'Working in the middle ground: an interview with Nina Bekker' by Lynne Matheson (pages 34-35).

This issue of 'Fine print' contains the following feature articles: 'Ingenious A-frame programs' by Lynda Achren (pages 3-7) ...  Show Full Abstract  

Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Tasmania; Australia; Oceania;
Resource type: Journal issue
Subjects: Technology; Teaching and learning; Literacy;

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Changing configurations of adult education in transitional times: conference proceedings

This volume contains papers presented at the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) 2013 conference held at Humboldt University in Berlin.

This volume contains papers presented at the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) 2013 ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Kapplinger, Bernd; Lichte, Nina; Haberzeth, Erik;
Conference name: European Research Conference
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Europe; Great Britain; Spain;
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Adult and community education; Students; Higher education;

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The potential of authentic learning and emerging technologies for developing graduate attributes

Graduate attributes, such as critical thinking and problem-solving in real-world contexts, are increasingly being recognised as crucial for students to develop in higher education for employability and critical citizenship. The question of how best to create conducive spaces in the curriculum for students to acquire these abilities is, however, less well documented. The authors propose that one way to enable students to achieve these attributes would be for higher educators to engage in authentic learning, using Herrington, Reeves and Oliver's (2010) model as a guide. In this article, one case study is selected from a sample of 10 interviews conducted with University of the Western Cape (UWC) lecturers as it rated highly on all nine elements of authentic learning. The curriculum design and teaching and learning practices are analysed using each of Herrington et al's elements for authentic learning and the potential of these elements for developing graduate attributes is considered.

Graduate attributes, such as critical thinking and problem-solving in real-world contexts, are increasingly being recognised ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bozalek, Vivienne; Watters, Kathy
Conference name: Higher Education Learning and Teaching Association of Southern Africa Conference
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Technology; Students;

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Opportunities and challenges of MOOCS: perspectives from Asia

The recent growth of massive open online courses (MOOCs) has led to discussions of technology-based instruction revolutionizing traditional higher education teaching. Here [the author analyzes] the origin of MOOCs, as well as trends in education initiated by these courses, and compares them with OpenCourseWare (OCW), YouTube EDU, and iTunes U. Specifically, this paper will discuss the opportunities and challenges presented by MOOCs, from the perspective of Asian countries, with reference to economics, culture, language, and instruction.

The recent growth of massive open online courses (MOOCs) has led to discussions of technology-based instruction ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Chen, Joyce Chao-chen
Conference name: International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions World Library and Information Congress
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Asia
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Higher education; Technology;

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