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Innovations in Tertiary Education Delivery Summit: summary of proceedings

The Innovations in Tertiary Education Delivery Summit 2014 (ITES 2014) was held on 5-6 June in Auckland, New Zealand and was hosted by the Minister for Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment. The purpose of ITES 2014 was to start a national conversation about innovative new ways of delivering tertiary education, the opportunities and challenges these present, and the future of tertiary education. This document provides a record of proceedings and identifies key themes to emerge from the sessions. The themes identified were: evolution of practice enabled by technologies; the value of innovative teaching and learning practices, on their own and in combination with traditional delivery; recognition and support for new ways of learning; and roadblocks to change. These themes have been identified to help inform and shape the understanding and actions of all tertiary stakeholders: tertiary education organisations (TEOs), students, interest groups and government. The content represents the views of the attendees, and is not a reflection of the government's position.

The Innovations in Tertiary Education Delivery Summit 2014 (ITES 2014) was held on 5-6 June in Auckland, New Zealand and was ...  Show Full Abstract  

Conference name: Innovations in Tertiary Education Delivery Summit
Corporate authors: New Zealand. Ministry of Education (MOE)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Oceania
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Higher education; Teaching and learning; Innovation

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Reform of the ESOS framework: discussion paper

This discussion paper emerged from a round of stakeholder consultations held earlier this year. Stakeholders consulted included Australian Council for Private Education and Training, TAFE Directors Australia, English Australia, the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA), the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA), and the Council of International Students Australia. The paper proposes specific changes to legislation and regulation in areas covering: streamlining quality assurance agency processes; reducing the reporting burden; minimising Tuition Protection Service requirements; increasing flexibility in education delivery; transfer of students from one provider to another; welfare of students aged under 18; working with stakeholders to produce a practical and accessible National Code and explanatory guide for Education Services for Overseas Students (ESOS); and registration charges. Education institutions, training organisations, peak bodies and agencies are invited to respond to the paper via written submissions which must be received by 31 October 2014.

This discussion paper emerged from a round of stakeholder consultations held earlier this year. Stakeholders consulted ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Department of Education
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Discussion paper
Subjects: International education; Higher education; Governance;

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VET e-standards for training: recommendations for 2014

The vocational education and training (VET) e-standards were developed by the E-standards for Training business activity under the Australian Flexible Learning Framework, and continue to be maintained under the National VET E-learning Strategy. The e-standards are reviewed and ratified by the E-standards Expert Group (EEG), which is the National Senior Officials Committee (NSOC) endorsed technical standards body for the VET sector. Standards ratified by the EEG are endorsed by the Flexible Learning Advisory Group (FLAG) for implementation by the states and territories and relevant national agencies. This document provides a summary of the VET e-standards. The e-standards recommendations are intended to remove barriers to e-learning, and ensure maximum interoperability of VET systems and content. The e-standards maximise the viability, integrity and portability of e-learning resources and are developed with the aim to ensure that resource development follows internationally accepted specifications. The technologies and applications used to build and deliver the resources ensure the most consistent operation and widest possible use and reuse of those resources.

The vocational education and training (VET) e-standards were developed by the E-standards for Training business activity ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Flexible Learning Advisory Group (FLAG)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Guide
Series name: National VET E-learning Strategy
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Teaching and learning; Technology;

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Do higher education institutions make a difference in competence development?: a model of competence production at university

This paper proposes a model of competence development required of graduates at work which suggests that universities make a difference when they add value to their students. They add value by ensuring that their modes of teaching and learning, and assessment positively enhance the competencies of their students which are important in the labor market. [The] results have clear implications for policy in the Bologna process. One of the main challenges facing higher education institutions in Europe is to transform their current pedagogical practices - the lecture continues to be the dominant teaching method - into competence-based teaching as a response of universities to labor market needs. In this paper, econometric evidence shows that innovative methodologies used by Spanish universities play a key role in competence development. This is consistent with the view that education raises productivity; a finding that refutes some theories which suggest that education may be no more than a screening device which allows employers to identify the more able potential employees from the rest. Besides the importance of formal academic institutions, firms appear to be sources of learning and skill formation as well.

This paper proposes a model of competence development required of graduates at work which suggests that universities make a ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Velasco, Manuel Salas
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Spain; Europe
Journal title: Higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Employment; Research;

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Commonwealth controls over Australian schools, TAFEs and universities via tied funding: time for Constitutional reform?

A matter of some controversy in schools, TAFEs and universities has been the advent of significant controls over these state and territory law bodies by the Commonwealth Government, based on the supply of grants linked to conditions. Under the previous Howard Government the conditions required significant workplace reforms (including Australian Workplace Agreements) at the university and TAFE level. Commonwealth grants for state and private schools contain conditions relating to curriculum, school reports, statements of learning, and various school performance targets. Such controls were never envisaged for the Commonwealth in the Constitution. This paper examines in some detail the conditions imposed on schools, TAFE and universities, describes the constitutional position relating to regulation of education by the Commonwealth, including the potential use of the corporations power, and makes suggestions for reform.

A matter of some controversy in schools, TAFEs and universities has been the advent of significant controls over these state ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Jackson, Jim
Date: 2008
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Australia and New Zealand journal of law and education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Finance; Governance; Providers of education and training;

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The problem of Aboriginal marginalisation: education, labour markets and social and emotional well-being

In this paper [the authors] identify and discuss the characteristics and consequences of marginalisation among Aboriginal communities throughout Australia. Forms of marginalisation experienced by many Aboriginal people are shaped by complex, and often ambiguous relationships between age, social class, gender and ethnic/cultural backgrounds. The characteristics and consequences of these challenges, of marginalisation, are diverse and have been understood in a variety of ways by social researchers, and in public and policy debates. In this paper [the authors] list the extent or scale of the challenges Aboriginal people face in the context of education, employment and social and emotional well-being. [The authors] then provide some commentary around these issues and discuss some of the debates that [they] have encountered in academic, policy and media discourses. It is important to acknowledge from the outset that these fields are linked by various shared experiences within Aboriginal communities, including the many consequences of the Stolen Generations.

In this paper [the authors] identify and discuss the characteristics and consequences of marginalisation among Aboriginal ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Campbell, Perri; Kelly, Peter; Harrison, Lyn
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: Alfred Deakin Research Institute working paper
Subjects: Indigenous people; Employment; Teaching and learning;

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The urgency of postsecondary education for Aboriginal peoples

Canada has an unprecedented need to increase the number of Aboriginal peoples who undertake and complete postsecondary programs. Endorsing postsecondary education for Aboriginal peoples advocates an invigorating, fortifying future for Aboriginal peoples, their families, and their communities. Additionally, the postsecondary educational achievements of Aboriginal peoples support the health and sustainability of the Canadian nation; spearheaded by Western Canada's current economic prosperity, human resources supplied by Aboriginal peoples have become increasingly important. Captured herein are demographic, social, educational, and economic trends reinforcing the rationale that Aboriginal peoples urgently need to be provided with greater opportunities to succeed in postsecondary education.

Canada has an unprecedented need to increase the number of Aboriginal peoples who undertake and complete postsecondary ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Preston, Jane P.
Date: 2008
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Journal title: Canadian journal of educational administration and policy
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Indigenous people; Higher education; Participation;

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Access to post-secondary education in Canada among first and second generation Canadian immigrants: raw differences and some of the underlying factors

This research exploits the extremely rich and relatively under-utilised Youth in Transition Survey, Reading Cohort ('YITS-A') to investigate access to post-secondary education (PSE) amongst the children of immigrants, including both (1) those who themselves came to this country as immigrants but arrived early enough to face their PSE opportunities in Canada; and (2) those who were born in Canada to parents who were immigrants. [The] results show that both these first- and second-generation immigrants are, overall, considerably more likely to attend PSE than non-immigrant youth (i.e., 'third generation' and higher Canadians), that these differences are driven principally by higher university participation rates rather than college attendance, and that the patterns vary a great deal by source country and the specific combination of the mother's and father's immigration status and origin (i.e., when they are not both immigrants or from the same country). [The authors] also find that these patterns are partly explained by certain demographic characteristics (e.g., urban residence, living in a two-parent family), by immigrants' parents' education levels (the children of high education parents are generally more likely to go to PSE and immigrants tend to have relatively highly educated parents), and other observable factors, but that some important differences remain even after controlling for these. [They] then show that these remaining differences are to some degree related to high school grades and a range of 'scale' variables that reflect young people's high school experiences, including their academic and social engagement, self esteem, and so on, but again some differences remain after even this extensive set of regressors is added. [The authors] discuss these patterns, and the possible explanations of the remaining differences.

This research exploits the extremely rich and relatively under-utilised Youth in Transition Survey, Reading Cohort ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Finnie, Ross; Mueller, Richard E.
Date: 2008
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Culture and society; Equity; Migration;

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Gender analysis of open and distance learning in the Caribbean region

This report provides an overview and analysis of the existing literature on open and distance learning (ODL) in the Caribbean from a gender perspective. It covers a wide range of themes encompassing the socio-cultural and economic factors. For some there was no data or analysis available directly related to gender issues or the data available is over 10 years old. In these instances, the report summarized key ODL issues in that area and assessed the relevant gender equality issues and questions influencing the related current practices and status.

This report provides an overview and analysis of the existing literature on open and distance learning (ODL) in the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Peebles, Dana
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Central America and the Caribbean
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Gender; Teaching and learning; Technology;

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Indiana industry sectors that hire ex-offenders: implications to correctional education programs

Previous studies consistently showed that post release employment was a major contributing factor for recidivism among ex-offenders, but the studies lacked specific information about the type of employment found by ex-offenders. The main focus of the five-year follow-up study was to analyse which industrial sectors would likely employ ex-offenders. This study contained data from 6,561 released offenders who represented approximately 43 per cent of 15,184 offenders released from the Indiana Department of Correction correctional facilities throughout 2005. Additionally, the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provided crucial employment-related information for the present researchers to examine the industrial sectors that employed these ex-offenders. Results of this study showed that 62.4 per cent (n=4,096) were employed in a variety of sectors for at least one quarter in any given year during the study period of 2005 to 2009. By using the North American Industry Classification System to categorize these jobs, this study found the primary sectors that employed ex-offenders were related to: administrative support, waste management and remediation services; accommodation and food services; manufacturing; construction; retail trade; or health care and social assistance. Also, a significant number of ex-offenders found employment in 'temporary help services'. The authors discuss the implications for correctional education programs.

Previous studies consistently showed that post release employment was a major contributing factor for recidivism among ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Nally, John M.; Lockwood, Susan; Ho, Taiping;
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Journal title: Journal of correctional education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Disadvantaged; Industry; Teaching and learning;

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