Search results

Advanced search   My selection

National guidelines for implementing e-portfolios in VET

E-portfolios are learner-driven collections of digital artefacts articulating experiences, achievements and evidence of learning. There is a wide range of potential benefits for implementing e-portfolios: learners can develop, leverage off and gain recognition of their skills and competence; employers and industry can more efficiently understand and confirm the skills and competence of employees and potential employees, and can also support effective on the job training practices; and training organisations and government can improve recognition of prior learning and current competence outcomes, and facilitate new learning and teaching methods to better respond to the needs of learners and industry. These guidelines are aimed at implementers of e-portfolios for vocational education and training (VET) sector learners, including teachers and trainers as well as management. They provide practical guidance and recommendations on the challenges to successfully implementing e-portfolios in the VET sector. These challenges include: understanding e-portfolio privacy and ownership issues; managing access to both verified and unverified e-portfolio content; storing e-portfolio content securely and persistently; and embedding e-portfolios and facilitating learner transitions. The guidelines have been designed for e-portfolio implementers to interpret and adapt to their local context as required. A set of functional specifications has been produced to complement this document, which discusses and describes technical implementation approaches for e-portfolios and related systems.

E-portfolios are learner-driven collections of digital artefacts articulating experiences, achievements and evidence of ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: O'Neill, Owen; Miller, Allison; Gladman, Kristena;
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Guide
Series name: National VET E-learning Strategy
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Teaching and learning; Technology

VITAL Object

TVET stigmatization in developing countries: reality or fallacy?

TVET (technical vocational education and training) programmes have been in existence in most developing African countries including Ghana for decades. But their intended productive and inventive output of producing readily employable and or self-employable graduates, and serving as a real economic bail out for the deteriorating economies in Africa is yet to be achieved. This worrying development has culminated in a stigmatization towards the study of the TVET programmes in higher institutions in Ghana. This paper therefore explores briefly the historicity of TVET in Ghana, including the tertiary-based TVET institutions (particularly, polytechnics and universities). Through in-depth inquiry, this paper investigates the root cause of the stigmatization and its concomitant effects on the nation, the learners and the higher institutions of training in such programmes. Using comparative analytical methodology, the study revealed that there is: curriculum deficiency in TVET programmes; logistical challenge due to inadequate funding; poor linkage of TVET to industry; an unfair trend of inappropriate categorization of graduates on the field; and a continuous chain of leadership crisis. The paper recommends more dynamic, innovative and modern curriculum review to include product and industrial design courses such as animation, game design, robotics, interior decoration, multimedia design, aircraft, automobile and ship design, structural and industrial painting and medical engineering.

TVET (technical vocational education and training) programmes have been in existence in most developing African countries ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Essel, Osuanyi Quaicoo; Agyarkoh, Eric; Mohammed, Sumaila;
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Ghana; Africa
Journal title: European journal of training and development studies
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Providers of education and training; Industry;

VITAL Object

Discipline-based teaching and identity expansion: teacher education and the tertiary vocational educator in New Zealand

The vocational tertiary teaching work force in New Zealand is made up of individuals from an extensive range of occupational backgrounds. When their occupational or discipline-based expertise is employed within institutes of technology and polytechnics (ITPs) and private training establishments (PTEs) they make up another occupational group - that of vocational education or training practitioner. With diverse work-based backgrounds, vocational educators undertake their work within the teaching workforce often without a strong sense of their educational position or function and there is little guidance in the complexities and realities of the role. This paper considers the role of vocational educators and the practices of professional development or tertiary teacher education that might support building a multi-layered identity encompassing their discipline expertise and their role as an educator.

The vocational tertiary teaching work force in New Zealand is made up of individuals from an extensive range of occupational ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Maurice-Takerei, Lisa; Anderson, Helen
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Oceania
Journal title: New Zealand journal of teachers' work
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Higher education; Workforce development;

VITAL Object

We are the products of our experiences: the role higher education plays in prison

As of 2012, an estimated 2.2 million people were incarcerated in jails and prisons in the United States. Prisoners are disproportionately likely to come from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, to be members of racial/ethnic minority groups, to have held a low-skill, low-paying job (if any at all) at the time of arrest, and to be less educated than their counterparts in the general population. Data suggest that better educated prisoners are less likely to relapse into criminal behavior after release from prison. Education leads to jobs and trades which help people step away from crime. This paper reflects on life and prison experiences for some prisoners that led to shifts in perceptions of the role of higher education in prison. This article draws on the importance of higher education in prisons, but also adds a new dimension by drawing on the benefits of inside-out college courses in prison that include university students, requires the same course work, and provides college credit for both sets of students. This article seeks to demonstrate that experience and education are the most effective tools for change. If penal policy is left as it stands, there will be no change for the overwhelming majority of men and women who are eventually returning to prison communities. In this article [the authors] address how their experiences shaped their understanding of the 'fast life', their prison and educational experiences, as well as those of former and current prisoners, the glaring connections between education and recidivism, and possible solutions for penal education policies.

As of 2012, an estimated 2.2 million people were incarcerated in jails and prisons in the United States. Prisoners are ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Shoemaker, Robert; Willis, Brandon; Bryant, Angela
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Journal title: Journal of prisoners on prisons
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Disadvantaged; Higher education;

VITAL Object

Functional specifications for VET e-portfolio implementers and developers

This resource was developed within the context of the national VET E-portfolio Guidelines and is designed to support the implementation of e-portfolio systems in the vocational education and training (VET) sector. While e-portfolios are learner-driven collections of digital artefacts and can contain a wide range of content, this document focuses specifically on the role that e-portfolios can play in enabling learners to manage access to verifiable Attainment Information. Attainment Information includes units of competency, accredited modules and qualifications or accredited courses as defined by the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF). The purpose of this document is to provide practical, technically focused information for implementers of e-portfolio and related systems. It outlines a number of potential technical implementation approaches and considers the advantages and disadvantages of each one.

This resource was developed within the context of the national VET E-portfolio Guidelines and is designed to support the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: O'Neill, Owen; Gladman, Kristena; Lapham, Bronwyn;
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Guide
Series name: National VET E-learning Strategy
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Technology; Teaching and learning

VITAL Object

Nailing down an identity: the voices of six carpentry educators

This paper reports on a small research study in which six carpentry tutors at an urban polytechnic were interviewed regarding their identity and perceptions of their work as trades educators. Some preliminary findings suggest that the ‘occupational identity’ (Seddon, 2008) of trades educators as ‘teachers’ is less problematic than suggested (Haycock and Kelly, 2009). This paper argues that notions of good teaching within institutes of technology and polytechnics (ITPs) may be driven by normative/singular notions of pedagogy that do not recognize specific or ‘signature pedagogies’ (Shulman, 2005) active within trades education. It is suggested that further work in the area of ‘signature pedagogies’ for the trades will legitimise trade educator practice. However, it may challenge professional developers, teacher trainers and educational administrators within institutions to reconsider their assumptions about what constitutes ‘good teaching’ in a trade related environment.

This paper reports on a small research study in which six carpentry tutors at an urban polytechnic were interviewed ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Maurice-Takerei, Lisa; Jesson, Joce
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Oceania
Journal title: New Zealand journal of teachers' work
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Teaching and learning; Vocational education and training

VITAL Object

No higher priority: Aboriginal post-secondary education in Canada

In recognition of the urgent and ongoing need to address key issues related to the education of First Nations, Inuit and Metis people, the Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development decided, on 15 May 2006, to undertake a study of Aboriginal education in Canada. On 14 June 2006, following a series of general briefings by National Aboriginal Organizations and officials from the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, the committee further decided to focus its study on Aboriginal post-secondary education. Accordingly, the committee convened eight hearings in June, September and October 2006 to examine issues relevant to that topic. This report presents the committee's findings.

In recognition of the urgent and ongoing need to address key issues related to the education of First Nations, Inuit and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Canada. Parliament. House of Commons. Standing Committee on Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development
Date: 2007
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Indigenous people; Teaching and learning;

VITAL Object

Access to post-secondary education: does class still matter?

In this paper, the author argues that the majority of Canadians believe that their children will attend a post-secondary educational institution when they finish high school. Further education after high school education is increasingly seen as a vitally important part of a person's life, both for participation and success in the knowledge economy. According to recent reports, Canada has the greatest proportion of citizens with postsecondary education of all of the OECD countries. The Canadian Government pledged in 2002 to ensure that 'one hundred per cent of high school graduates have the opportunity to participate in some form of post-secondary education'. The author suggests however, that questions remain about how accessible post-secondary education really is in Canada. Although participation in post-secondary education has remained strong in the face of rising up-front costs to individual students, it is not clear that particular groups of people are being represented in all aspects of post-secondary education. Using the variables of family income, parental income, and parental occupation, the author assesses the relationship between socioeconomic status and access to post-secondary education.

In this paper, the author argues that the majority of Canadians believe that their children will attend a post-secondary ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Rounce, Andrea
Date: 2004
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Equity; Teaching and learning; Participation;

VITAL Object

Post-secondary education: accessibility and affordability review

Saskatchewan has a system of post-secondary education that is comprised of a variety of institutions throughout the province, students in numerous programs, and learners at different stages of their lives and careers. It is vital that this system, with diverse stakeholders with differing missions and mandates, provides learners with multiple ways of accessing and completing post-secondary education. The system must be able to provide and support access for all learners throughout their lives and be sensitive to the different paths learners may take to post-secondary education. In this report, the author proposes policy options that would make Saskatchewan a national leader in affordable and accessible post-secondary education and training.

Saskatchewan has a system of post-secondary education that is comprised of a variety of institutions throughout the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: McCall, Warren
Date: 2007
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Equity; Higher education; Teaching and learning;

VITAL Object

Returning to high school in Ontario: adult students, postsecondary plans and program supports

This exploratory study was designed to examine the role of adult high school programs in supporting postsecondary access. Although high school programs for adults are considered a 'non-traditional pathway' to postsecondary education (PSE), this study demonstrates that they are an inherent part of a comprehensive education system. The study's reach is intentionally wide in order to draw attention to the important role of adult high school programs. The following topics are addressed: the adult high school student population; their postsecondary plans and concerns; the adult high school learning environment; and postsecondary transition supports for adult students. Both quantitative and qualitative data were collected from close to 500 adult students in programs throughout the province of Ontario in Canada.

This exploratory study was designed to examine the role of adult high school programs in supporting postsecondary access. ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Pinsent-Johnson, Christine; Howell, Shannon; King, Rebekka
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Students; Teaching and learning; Adult and community education;

VITAL Object