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The impact and reach of MOOCs: a developing countries' perspective

[Massive] open online courses (MOOCs) are a recent but hugely popular phenomenon in the online learning world. They are hailed by many as a solution for the developing world's lack of access to education because MOOCs can provide learning opportunities to a massive number of learners from anywhere in the world as long as they can access the course through Internet. However, a close consideration of the ability of learners from most developing countries to make use of MOOCs seems to contradict this rhetoric. This paper discusses features of MOOCs and looks at them from a developing countries' perspective to conclude that due to a complicated set of conditions ('access', language, computer literacy, among others) prevailing in developing countries, MOOCs may not be a viable solution for education for a large proportion of people in these areas of the world. The paper further shows the need for more data on the demographics of MOOC participants from developing countries to form a better understanding of MOOCs role in educating people from developing countries.

[Massive] open online courses (MOOCs) are a recent but hugely popular phenomenon in the online learning world. They are ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Liyanagunawardena, Tharindu; Williams, Shirley; Adams, Andrew
Date: 2013
Journal title: eLearning papers
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Economics; Equity;

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Understanding the MOOC trend: the adoption and impact of massive open online courses

This paper addresses three questions: What makes [massive open online courses] MOOCs different from previous online and open education efforts? Will MOOCs generate a positive return on investment for their providers? What can be learnt from early entrants into large-scale online instruction?

This paper addresses three questions: What makes [massive open online courses] MOOCs different from previous online and open ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Attis, David; Koproske, Colin; Miller, Chris
Date: 2012
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Higher education; Teaching and learning; Finance;

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Education indicators in Canada: an international perspective 2014

This sixth annual report in the series covers certain aspects of the educational systems in Canada's provinces and territories and places them in an international context. The indicators presented here align with the definitions and methodologies used by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). This set of internationally comparable indicators offers statistical information for the following key themes: Chapter A, The output of educational institutions and the impact of learning, profiles educational attainment among the adult population. It also presents information on graduation and completion rates at the upper secondary level, and on relationships between educational attainment and labour market outcomes. Chapter B, Financial resources invested in education, focuses on spending on education. This information is presented both in terms of expenditure per student and expenditure in relation to the overall amount of resources as measured by gross domestic product (GDP). The proportions of current and capital expenditures are also outlined. Chapter C, Access to education, participation and progression, explores the extent of international student enrolment in college and university programs in Canada and its provinces and territories, and how this has changed over time. Several aspects of the transition from education to the labour force are examined, including the extent to which young adults are neither employed nor in education. Chapter D, The learning environment and organization of schools, reports on the amount of time students must, in principle, spend in class as established by public regulations. It also presents information on key aspects of working environments for elementary and secondary school teachers: teaching time (as determined by policy) in the context of total working time, and salary. Chapter E, Skills proficiencies of adults, is an addition for 2014. The Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) assessed the literacy, numeracy and problem solving skills of adults aged 16 to 65. This chapter outlines a selection of results from PIAAC that also draws on respondents' answers to questions about their education and employment status, as well as various social outcomes such as good health, volunteering, trust in others and trust in government.

This sixth annual report in the series covers certain aspects of the educational systems in Canada's provinces and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Statistics Canada. Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics Division
Council of Ministers of Education (Canada) (CMEC)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: North America; Canada
Resource type: Statistical resource
Subjects: Statistics; Participation; Outcomes;

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Exploring the training needs of older workers in the foodservice industry

The current study explored older workers' perceptions of the training they receive in foodservice establishments, including perceptions of training methods, pace, and the use of technology in training. Data for this study were collected through two focus groups of foodservice employees 55 and older, where participants responded to semi-structured questions about their training experiences. Analysis of the focus group data revealed three overarching themes: (1) need for better leadership, (2) training structure, and (3) pride and enjoyment at work. Respondents emphasized the importance of managerial support, were eager for continued training, perceived the greatest benefit to on-the-job training, and appreciated the use of technology in training but were frustrated with the short time allocated to learning new technologies. Recommendations are made for training practices endorsed by older workers that organizations could adopt to improve the retention and performance of older workers, who are increasingly becoming important to the hospitality industry.

The current study explored older workers' perceptions of the training they receive in foodservice establishments, including ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ravichandran, Swathi; Cichy, Kelly E.; Powers, Monica;
Date: 2015
Journal title: International journal of hospitality management
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Industry; Teaching and learning;

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VET teacher, trainer and assessor capabilities, qualifications and development: issues and options

This report is a conceptual piece commissioned by the National Skills Standards Council (NSSC). It maps teacher/trainer and assessor qualifications, and considers these in light of the capability frameworks and key research undertaken by a range of agencies and researchers on the quality of [vocational education and training] VET teacher, trainer and assessor education and training, professional development and practice. This work is situated within the broader reviews of the standards for the regulation of VET being undertaken by the NSSC and has arisen because appropriate qualifications and standards for VET teachers, trainers and assessors are key to the future success of VET in meeting industry and individual needs. This project has used a mixed methods approach to gather relevant information and data, including: (1) reviewing existing research and other work which defines and reports on VET teaching, training and assessment and its quality; the report also discusses the identified capabilities and roles of VET teachers, trainers and assessors, the contexts and places in which they work and the diverse group of learners and other clients they support; (2) gathering or utilising time series data on the numbers of providers delivering selected qualifications in the [Training and Education] TAE 10 Training Package and in selected VET teacher/trainer education courses in the higher education sector - these data have been gathered as a time series (2005 to 2011) and build on, and update, earlier work undertaken on initial VET teacher and trainer education and training by Guthrie et al. (2010); and (3) conducting a small number of targeted interviews with key individuals and groups - those approached include members of the National VET Workforce Development Managers Group, the Australian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group (ACDEVEG), the Australian Workforce Productivity Agency, Innovation and Business Skills Australia (IBSA), the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA), the Australian Council for Private Education and Training (ACPET), TAFE Directors Australia (TDA) and a small number of individual providers.

This report is a conceptual piece commissioned by the National Skills Standards Council (NSSC). It maps teacher/trainer and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Guthrie, Hugh; Every, Pam
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Workforce development; Qualifications;

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Hills College review: directions for the future

The study was undertaken to assess the needs of the community served by the Hills College of TAFE given its gradual transition from a predominantly rural to an increasingly suburban/hobby farming community which has brought with it an associated growth in service industries. The study has included the following areas of analysis: (1) a statistical description of the community served by the college; (2) an exploration of community needs through field study; (3) a study of the college programme 1981-1984; and (4) projections of future enrolments at the college to 1991. The final sections of the report draw the analyses together in an effort to identify future directions for the further development of the college.

The study was undertaken to assess the needs of the community served by the Hills College of TAFE given its gradual ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Lee, J.
Date: 1985
Geographic subjects: South Australia; Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Vocational education and training; Demographics;

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Australian VET system performance 2009-13: data tables

This publication brings together data from across the National Centre for Vocational Education Research's (NCVER's) statistical collections and surveys used to inform the performance of the national training system and covers training activity that occurred between 2009 and 2013. The Australian vocational education and training (VET) system covers training delivered by a variety of public and private training providers. These include technical and further education (TAFE) institutes and other government providers, universities, secondary schools, industry organisations, adult migrant education scheme providers, enterprises, agricultural colleges, community education providers and privately operated registered training organisations. The information in the data tables covers total reported and government-funded VET activity, and refers to all aspects of VET for which data are available for reporting. Not all VET data are available for reporting, because arrangements are not yet in place to collect data from all private providers and community education providers.

This publication brings together data from across the National Centre for Vocational Education Research's (NCVER's) ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Statistical resource
Subjects: Statistics; Vocational education and training; Providers of education and training;

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Learning to make a difference: student-community engagement and the higher education curriculum

This guide presents current thinking and innovations in development and professional practice in student-community engagement (SCE), defined here as students being involved in community projects local to their university. This would usually involve the inclusion within the higher education curriculum of a period of time during which students work for a community-based organisation in ways that enable them to benefit the community and learn from their experience. Developing students' understanding of questions of equality and social justice, and a sense of social responsibility, is an outcome central to SCE programs and the authors have written this book as a response to this. The first section looks at the history of the university and the place of engagement or social responsibility in it. The second section provides some practical support in designing and developing SCE within a university setting, showing how learning from community engagement can enrich a university education. Section three provides some case studies written by students or community partners associated with the Community University Partnership Programme (CUPP) at the University of Brighton.

This guide presents current thinking and innovations in development and professional practice in student-community ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Millican, Juliet; Bourner, Tom
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Book
Subjects: Students; Higher education; Teaching and learning;

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Caring counts Tautiaki tika

As many as 48,000 workers in New Zealand, the vast majority of them women, undertake indispensable but largely invisible employment every day. They care for older people either in their homes, in residential aged care facilities, or in hospitals. The New Zealand Human Rights Commission's decision to hold this Inquiry into the Aged Care Workforce was prompted by two significant concerns. The first relates to the low pay, the undervaluing, and the pay disparity for many thousands of New Zealanders working in the aged care sector. The second relates to the nexus between the value society places on the aged care workforce and on the respect and dignity of older New Zealanders. The Inquiry gathered evidence from 886 participants over a 12 month period in 2011-2012. Part 3 presents the evidence in the following sections: Respect and value; Workforce supply, recruitment and retention; Conditions of work; Wages and pay parity; Staff to resident ratios; Training and qualifications; Managerial competence; Men as carers; Migrant workforce; Regulatory frameworks.

As many as 48,000 workers in New Zealand, the vast majority of them women, undertake indispensable but largely invisible ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: New Zealand. Human Rights Commission
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Oceania; New Zealand
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Industry; Employment; Outcomes;

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Educational attainment of second-generation immigrants: a US-Canada comparison

In this paper, [the author] analyzes educational outcomes for second generation immigrants and compares them to those of natives. [The author] uses a dynamic structural model and focuses on transition paths from school to work for youths in Canada and the US. Using data extracted from the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth and the 2000 Youth in Transition Survey, [the author] finds that family background is closely related to educational attainment of white children of immigrants in both countries. Moreover, cognitive abilities seem to be more important in determining youths' educational attainment in the US than in Canada. However, [the author] finds no evidence suggesting that the effects of key family environment variables on educational attainment differ between children of immigrants and children of natives. Results from counterfactual simulations suggest that incentive-based educational reforms, such as providing educational subsidies to reduce the costs of secondary and post-secondary education, are more effective in increasing overall educational attainment for both groups. In addition, the desired dollar amount of these educational subsidies are smaller in Canada than in the US. On the other hand, immigration policies designed to admit only highly educated individuals have modest effects on educational attainment of second generation immigrants. Finally, there is very little difference in educational outcomes between the two groups in Canada and the US despite very different immigration policies, at least for the ethnic group (whites) considered in this paper.

In this paper, [the author] analyzes educational outcomes for second generation immigrants and compares them to those of ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Liu, Xingfei
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: North America; Canada; United States
Resource type: Discussion paper
Series name: IZA discussion paper
Subjects: Research; Migration; Outcomes;

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