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Reconceptualised life skills in secondary education in the African context: lessons learnt from reforms in Ghana

Early notions of life skills in Africa did not take into account the importance of a flexible and portable set of skills that would enable youth to adapt to changes in the world of work and lay the foundations for productive well-being and behaviour. Rather, life skills education in many secondary education curricula in Africa started with an emphasis on developing specific technical vocational skills considered essential for employability or self-employment. Using Ghana as an example, this paper shows how secondary education curriculum reformers recommended shifts that embraced a new interpretation of life skills focused on 21st-century skills. This gradual move also reflected the difficulty that secondary education in general has had in networking with the world of work to provide work experience that would lead to the development of work-related skills and enhance employability. The author's main argument is that although the reconceptualisation of life skills in secondary education to reflect 21st-century skills is a welcome shift in the African context, this needs to be accompanied by reforms in teacher education. Classroom teaching and learning need to be adapted in a fundamental way in order to ensure that youth fully benefit from the inclusion of 21st-century life skills in secondary education curricula. Such reforms must include pedagogical practices which nurture communication, collaboration, creativity and critical thinking skills.

Early notions of life skills in Africa did not take into account the importance of a flexible and portable set of skills ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Akyeampong, Albert K.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Ghana; Africa
Journal title: International review of education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Youth; Skills and knowledge; Employment;

VITAL Object

The case for investing in secondary education in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA): challenges and opportunities

Over the next two decades, sub-Saharan Africa will face substantial pressure to expand its secondary education system. This is driven by the current low development of secondary education compared to other world regions, continued rapid population growth, the increase in the enrolment and completion rates at the primary education level, and the upsurge in the demand for skills. This paper suggests that in order to help countries respond to these pressures, external partners should now increase their support for secondary education, in terms of academic as well as technical and vocational skills training. Given the attributes of the African economies and the continuing need for foundation skills, this paper argues that in the current situation, particularly the lower secondary level will have to be strengthened, in many cases through a longer basic education cycle for all. The necessary rapid expansion of secondary education will require substantial investments, and this paper discusses how aid allocation can be made more evidence-based and used in a more strategic way to make these investments more effective and sustainable. While aid will continue to have a role to play over the next decade especially in fragile states, in the long run it is African countries' capacity to achieve sustained economic growth which will be the single most important factor determining their ability to meet the financing needs.

Over the next two decades, sub-Saharan Africa will face substantial pressure to expand its secondary education system. This ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Fredriksen, Birger; Fossberg, Camilla Helgo
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Africa
Journal title: International review of education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Secondary education; Policy; Sustainability;

VITAL Object

Rings of engagement: a model for MOOC enrollment

This article presents a new model for [massive open online course] MOOC enrollment, called ‘rings of engagement’, to address the issue of the extreme attrition rate in the current MOOC enrollment model. While the current MOOC enrollment model considers the total number of enrolled participants in a MOOC as the final number of enrolled learners, [the authors’] model has three circles of learners’ enrollment, based on learners’ learning needs. [The authors] argue that by creating three different circles of learners’ enrollment, [the authors] can keep track of learners’ performances and attrition rates in each circle to assess the effectiveness of MOOCs.

This article presents a new model for [massive open online course] MOOC enrollment, called ‘rings of engagement’, to address ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Vu, Phu; Fadde, Peter J.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Journal title: Journal of global literacies, technologies, and emerging pedagogies
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Participation; Research;

VITAL Object

Europe’s universities: main drivers in achieving the European Research Area (ERA): progress report on the implementation of the actions agreed in the Memorandum of Understanding signed between the European Commission and the European University Association

Results have been achieved by [European University Association] EUA, with its large membership, in moving forward the implementation of European Research Area [ERA] policies and raising further awareness of their importance. Survey results from a representative sample of EUA membership show that [European Commission] EC ERA initiatives on researcher career conditions, open recruitment and human resources excellence are being taken up in a substantial manner. On cross-border and regional cooperation, EUA has forged an innovative partnership with the Joint Research Centre (Seville)/[Directorate General] DG Regions Smart Specialisation Platform, focusing on existing ‘good practices’, their experience and lessons, and how universities could enhance their contribution in developing national and regional ‘Smart Specialisation Strategies’ for future maximisation of the use of the [European Union] EU regional funds for research and innovation activities leading to economic and social development. Finally, EUA has worked collectively with all Stakeholder Organisations (SHOs) who on 17 July 2012 signed the Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs)/Joint Statements in achieving agreement on ‘Common Principles’ governing Open Access, and has presented an agenda for a high-level dialogue with scientific publishers on the need for new business models that reflect the impact of digital technological developments on the process of the production of scientific knowledge for scientific publishing. Presented here is a progress report on these achievements made by EUA in the implementation of the actions agreed in the voluntary MoU.

Results have been achieved by [European University Association] EUA, with its large membership, in moving forward the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: European University Association (EUA)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe
Resource type: Report
Series name: EUA publications
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Students;

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Recognising and reconciling differences: mental health nurses and nursing students' perceptions of the preceptorship relationship

The main purpose of this study was to develop a substantive theory to describe the preceptorship relationship as informed by the study participants, student nurses and mental health nurses. Results show the core category identified for mental health nurses was 'attempting to accomplish connectedness' and for the students, 'coping with uncertainty'. There were also many sub-categories, one of which was identified by both groups. This category is the main focus of this paper; reconciling difference. Thus dealing with the uncertainty of, and reconciling differences between, the general and mental health environments emerged as a strong theme from the research. Student nurses were faced with confronting situations within the environment and made various suggestions for improvement so that their learning could be enhanced rather than inhibited.

The main purpose of this study was to develop a substantive theory to describe the preceptorship relationship as informed by ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Charleston, Rosemary; Happell, Brenda
Date: 2006
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Australian journal of advanced nursing
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Students; Skills and knowledge;

VITAL Object

Stakeholders' views in relation to curriculum development approaches for Australian clinical educators

Clinical educators in nursing perform a crucial role in facilitating effective learning for students of nursing. They have the potential to act as a catalysing agent for learning - motivating students to make links between theory and practice, moving students safely from the known to the unknown, developing clinical skills and reflective practice. Whilst their role is extremely important, clinical educators in Australia are undervalued and under-supported. They are isolated and fragmented, and lack a unifying professional body and infrastructure to assist them in education, research and practice development. This paper reports on a study to explore what educational solutions could help to resolve the problem. The authors conclude that there is strong support for a curriculum focused on clinical education and centred on the concept of a learning community in order to provide community and build capacity in the specialty group so that they become self-reliant and their achievements and contributions are sustainable.

Clinical educators in nursing perform a crucial role in facilitating effective learning for students of nursing. They have ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: McAllister, Margaret; Moyle, Wendy
Date: 2006
Geographic subjects: Australia; Queensland; Oceania
Journal title: Australian journal of advanced nursing
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Communities of practice; Providers of education and training;

VITAL Object

Applying quality principles to Australian university transnational teaching and learning

This report is of a project to apply a framework of quality principles to Australian university transnational teaching and learning, that is, to educational practices in Australian university programmes delivered and conducted 'offshore'. It is documented that the quality of Australian transnational higher education is uneven. Flawed quality puts at risk the reputation and financial security of Australian universities, the goodwill of host-countries and institutions and education's position as Australia's largest service export industry. In 2006, Australian universities called for the development of principles of quality to inform transnational teaching and learning practice. The 'Quality Principles' were subsequently developed. The project reported here transported the Principles into practice.

This report is of a project to apply a framework of quality principles to Australian university transnational teaching and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Pyvis, David
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: International education; Higher education; Quality;

VITAL Object

I will survive: strategies for improving lawyers' workplace satisfaction

This paper discusses proposed research on the wellbeing of Australian lawyers in the workplace. It examines what is known about workplace satisfaction for lawyers in Australia, compared with the worrying findings about the legal profession in the United States. The paper examines the likely causes of dissatisfaction including how universities traditionally teach law and what students are not told about legal practice. The authors discuss the need to investigate the wellbeing and satisfaction levels among newly admitted lawyers, and to consider ways to teach law that could help lawyers not only make wise career choices but develop strategies to cope better with stressors in their workplace. Clinical legal education could help students develop professionally as well as personally in order to improve their chances of having a happy and productive life at work.

This paper discusses proposed research on the wellbeing of Australian lawyers in the workplace. It examines what is known ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: James, Colin; Finlay-Jones, Jenny
Conference name: Asia-Pacific Educational Integrity Conference
Date: 2005
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia; North America;
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Industry; Employment; Workforce development;

VITAL Object

Vocational education for self-reliance

Today, according to the author, every individual requires education for self-reliance and this is seen by some as the path to national development. In this paper, the definitions for vocational education and self reliance are examined, objectives are highlighted, and some of the scopes stated. The importance of vocational education is highlighted along with some of the issues. From the discussions, conclusions are reached and recommendations offered. The paper concludes that vocational education, if properly administered, will lead to Nigeria becoming self-reliant nation.

Today, according to the author, every individual requires education for self-reliance and this is seen by some as the path ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Iloba, Lucky Odor
Date: 2011
Geographic subjects: Africa; Nigeria
Journal title: Agbor journal of science education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Teaching and learning; Culture and society;

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Aboriginal post-secondary education in British Columbia: a place for Aboriginal institutes: policy background paper

This paper is intended to outline possible ways to formally recognize Aboriginal-controlled post-secondary institutes as a critical component of the post-secondary system of British Columbia (BC). To begin, the paper outlines the unique and important role that is played by existing Aboriginal institutes, highlighting the fact that they do far more than duplicate the work being done in mainstream educational settings. The paper then outlines the rationale for stronger support of Aboriginal-controlled institutes by the government of BC. Finally, the paper outlines a recommended structure for policy that will allow the Ministry of Advanced Education (MAVED) to recognize and support Aboriginal institutes in a way that respects the range of Aboriginal community and learner needs and circumstances.

This paper is intended to outline possible ways to formally recognize Aboriginal-controlled post-secondary institutes as a ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: First Nations Education Steering Committee (Canada)
Date: 2008
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Indigenous people; Teaching and learning; Providers of education and training;

VITAL Object