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The journey from novice to expert: becoming curriculum designers and learning facilitators in Singapore’s Diploma of Adult and Continuing Education (DACE) programme

This research is part of a project that investigated issues related to the effectiveness of [Diploma in Adult and Continuing Education] DACE graduates in designing, implementing and facilitating quality [Workforce Skills Qualifications] WSQ curricula, and also traced their professional development journey before, during and after participation in the DACE programme. The aim of this two-pronged approach was to assess the readiness of DACE learners for their roles post-2015 as mandated Approved Training Organisation (ATO) curriculum designers, which requires providers to employ at least one DACE graduate to manage the development and implementation of WSQ-related programmes. This report is divided into three sections. First, the authors introduce the DACE programme and its context within the continuing education and training (CET) sector and Workforce Skills Qualifications (WSQ) framework. This is followed by a brief outline of the research questions, project methodology and data analysis approach. Second, the authors describe and analyse the ‘novice to expert’ literature and make some claims in relation to its strengths and weaknesses. Third, the authors provide a detailed summary and analysis of the collected interview data. The report concludes with recommendations for course designers, learning facilitators, and CET managers and employers.

This research is part of a project that investigated issues related to the effectiveness of [Diploma in Adult and Continuing ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Rushbrook, Peter; Bound, Helen; Sivalingam, Mahaletchumi
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Singapore; Asia
Resource type: Report
Series name: Research report (Centre for Work and Learning)
Subjects: Adult and community education; Teaching and learning; Providers of education and training;

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Eyes on the future: the impact of a university campus experience day on students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds

Students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds, rural areas, non-English speaking backgrounds and those who are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, have traditionally been underrepresented in higher education in Australia. The UC 4 Yourself experience day is an outreach program by the University of Canberra for schools identified as having substantial numbers of students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. It provides a full day of participation in, and gaining information about, university life. The current article reports on two survey studies (N = 525; N = 183) investigating the effectiveness of this program. Students who participated in the program were more likely to plan to attend university and were better able to imagine themselves as university students after their campus visit. Findings from the two studies suggest that the actual visit, despite its brevity, provides a unique experience by simultaneously establishing a knowledge base and facilitating the psychological transformation necessary to imagine a new future.

Students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds, rural areas, non-English speaking backgrounds and those who are ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Fleming, Michele J.; Grace, Diana M.
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Australian Capital Territory; Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Australian journal of education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Disadvantaged; Participation; Providers of education and training;

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1974-1976: the seeds of longevity in a pathway to tertiary participation at University of Newcastle, NSW

By the 1960s equality of opportunity was a dominant theme in social science research, and in keeping with this trend, the Whitlam Labor Government abolished university fees in 1974 to open university access, especially to talented women and men who otherwise would not contemplate a university career. In the same year also the University of Newcastle instituted a radical new plan to open up its doors to the wider community of 'non traditional students'. This paper explores the history of the enabling program that resulted, the Open Foundation Program, focusing on the 1974 pilot program and its first two years of full operation. Thought at the time likely to 'drain its market' within five years, the Open Foundation Program has flourished and grown for 40 years. The analysis focuses on hitherto unexplored aspects of the program and canvasses three key themes: curriculum and pedagogy, access and success, and support and retention, in order to understand the seeds of this longevity.

By the 1960s equality of opportunity was a dominant theme in social science research, and in keeping with this trend, the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: May, Josephine; Bunn, Rosalie J.
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: New South Wales; Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Australian journal of adult learning
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Participation; Students; Equity;

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Adult educator (AE) typology: final report

The aim of this research project was to develop a typology of adult educators (AEs) and corresponding careers in Singapore. The typology developed here can be used as a guide by developers of AEs to identify learning and development needs, and by employers of AEs to identify the diversity of their team of AEs. The development of the typology employed involved three stages: identifying the characteristics of AEs' work using interviews and focus groups; measuring and classifying AEs on these characteristics using an online survey of adult educators in Singapore (N=430); and testing the classification by seeing if and how the groups identified varied along a set of variables that are of general interest to policy makers and practitioners.

The aim of this research project was to develop a typology of adult educators (AEs) and corresponding careers in Singapore. ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Freebody, Simon; Bound, Helen; Lin, Magdalene
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Singapore; Asia
Resource type: Report
Series name: Research report (Centre for Work and Learning)
Subjects: Adult and community education; Providers of education and training; Career development;

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Labor market returns to community college awards: evidence from Michigan

[The authors] examine the relative labor market gains experienced by first-time college students who enrolled in five community colleges in Michigan in 2003 and 2004. [The authors] track credentials, credits, earnings, and employment for these students through 2011. [They] compare labor market outcomes of those who earned a credential (associate degree or certificate) to those who enrolled but did not earn a credential. The data sources consist of administrative records data from the colleges, Unemployment Insurance earnings data from the State of Michigan, and enrollment and graduation data from the National Student Clearinghouse. [The authors'] analytic sample consists of 20,581 students. [The authors] find that students who were awarded a long-term certificate (referred to as a 'diploma' in some states, including North Carolina) earned $2,500 to $3,600 more per year than did those without a credential, with the larger returns concentrated among men. For associate degrees, the estimated returns were $9,400 for women and $5,600 for men. Women saw little gain when awarded a short-term certificate, while men gained $5,200 per year. Estimated returns were highest in health-related and technical fields.

[The authors] examine the relative labor market gains experienced by first-time college students who enrolled in five ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bahr, Peter Riley; Dynarski, Susan; Jacob, Brian;
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: CAPSEE working paper
Subjects: Outcomes; Providers of education and training; Qualifications;

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Polytechnic development project: tracer study (volume 1 of 2): executive summary and final project report

The objectives of the project were to: conduct a tracer study of polytechnic graduates of six polytechnics; and develop research capability and the training of research counterparts in the polytechnics and the Planning and Research Division. Accordingly two reports on the project were completed: volume 1, which presents the executive summary and reports on the conduct of the project and the development of research capability; and volume 2, which presents basic results from the tracer study.

The objectives of the project were to: conduct a tracer study of polytechnic graduates of six polytechnics; and develop ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER)
IDP Education Australia
Date: 1999
Geographic subjects: Asia; Malaysia
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Evaluation; Employment;

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A qualitative inquiry of the roles, responsibilities, and relationships within work-based learning supervision

Although meaningful work experience and the support of caring adults are recognized as factors that promote positive youth development, research has given minimal attention to the role of the work-based learning (WBL) supervisor. Interviews with 12 supervisors, from work sites that were identified as successful by leaders from a catholic high school known for its high-quality work-study program for low-income adolescents, reveal that the roles, responsibilities, and relationships of WBL supervisors are complex and multifaceted. Supervisors seek to balance the goal-directed demands of managing a productive workplace with a relational commitment to teaching and mentoring young people. The results are discussed in light of relational theories of working and youth mentoring. Implications are explored for strengthening the selection and preparation of WBL supervisors who strive to enhance the life chances for low-income students of color.

Although meaningful work experience and the support of caring adults are recognized as factors that promote positive youth ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Kenny, Maureen E.; Medvide, Mary Beth; Minor, Kelly A.;
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Journal title: Journal of career development
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Workforce development; Students; Employment;

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'What's the sign for 'catch 22'?': barriers to professional formation for deaf teachers of British Sign Language in the further education sector

In 2007, Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills standards (QTLS) were introduced for all teachers working in UK further education (FE) institutions, with the expressed aim of improving professional standards within the sector. British Sign Language (BSL) teaching is largely delivered by deaf native signers through evening classes at local FE colleges, but the majority hold no formal teaching qualifications. Therefore this initiative provided BSL teachers with an opportunity to enhance their skills and practice, but also presented a formidable barrier to achieving qualified teacher status. Two research projects undertaken by the University of Central Lancashire in 2009 and 2010 assessed the suitability of training courses designed to help FE teachers achieve these new qualifications, with particular emphasis on whether these courses meet the specific pedagogic needs of deaf learners. The shortcomings in training provision that were found illustrate the invidious position deaf learners find themselves in, on the one hand wanting to enhance their skills and qualifications whilst at the same time being effectively barred from doing so by a lack of adequate and appropriate training opportunities. This article highlights some of the experiences of deaf BSL teachers seeking to gain these awards and illustrates the ways in which the delivery of training courses fails on virtually every level to respond to the different learning requirements of sign language users.

In 2007, Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills standards (QTLS) were introduced for all teachers working in UK further ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Barnes, Lynne; Atherton, Martin
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Journal title: Journal of further and higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Teaching and learning; Higher education;

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A study on the school-industry cooperation network of secondary vocational education institutions

School-industry cooperation in vocational education is a key factor that affects the purposes, courses and results of the education. However, vocational high schools and Meister high schools are having a hard time finding and building partnerships with companies for school-industry cooperation while the quality and content of the cooperation is limited. This research sees school-industry cooperative relationship of secondary vocational education institutions as a network. It finds that many schools have one too many networks with many companies. In terms of the depth of such partnerships, most school-company relationships are temporary and weak. In addition, industrial settings and characteristics of schools heavily affect the school-industry cooperation network. Based on the results, it proposes key policy actions such as establishment of national level strategies to vitalize school-industry cooperation in secondary schools, reinforcement of school-industry cooperation capabilities of schools and companies, and building supporting infrastructure.

School-industry cooperation in vocational education is a key factor that affects the purposes, courses and results of the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Choi, Su Jung
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Korea (South); Asia
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Providers of education and training; Industry

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The total picture

This year brings a landmark change in Australia's vocational education and training (VET) sector that in time will benefit a wide range of people and organisations, including consumers (students and employers), industry, registered training organisations (RTOs), policymakers and training regulators. For the first time, the National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER) will publish a more comprehensive picture of national training activity based on publicly funded training and privately funded training by private RTOs, collectively referred to as total VET activity (TVA). This brief article summarises the benefits and potential uses of the TVA data.

This year brings a landmark change in Australia's vocational education and training (VET) sector that in time will benefit a ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Fowler, Craig
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Journal title: Campus review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Statistics; Vocational education and training; Participation;

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