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Building higher education partnerships in the Maghreb

The governments in the Maghreb [the region of North Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea] are investing heavily in education, with an average of five per cent of their total [gross domestic product] GDP and 20 per cent of total government budgets being allocated towards this sector; however, government efforts to expand access to education have often sacrificed quality for quantity. Currently, students educated in local Maghreb institutions are not internationally or regionally competitive. Tunisia, the country with the most advanced education system in the Maghreb, has an average score on the international student assessment that is 20 per cent below the OECD average. One of the primary obstacles to addressing unemployment is the gap between university graduate skill sets and labor market demand. Most students who complete their education in the Maghreb do not possess the hard or soft skills necessary to be hired by private companies and compete in the global economy. Linkage between universities and the private sector is critical to ensure that curriculum and skills-training meets labor market demand. This linkage is also important for creating an educational ecosystem that encourages opportunities for students to engage with the private sector directly through activities such as student internships, job placement, mentorship, coaching, and others.

The governments in the Maghreb [the region of North Africa bordering the Mediterranean Sea] are investing heavily in ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Zuabi, Vanessa
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Africa; Algeria; Morocco;
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Outcomes;

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Using labor market data to improve student success

Community colleges have a unique opportunity to enable students to acquire the skills they need to [secure] good jobs with strong wages, but colleges can only fulfill this promise if they are taking advantage of available data to tailor their educational programs to current labor market needs and measure the labor market outcomes of their graduates. This guide explains how colleges can improve student labor market success after graduating, offering concrete examples and describing six data sets that colleges can use today.

Community colleges have a unique opportunity to enable students to acquire the skills they need to [secure] good jobs with ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Rassen, Elisa; Booth, Kathy; Falk, Erika;
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Guide
Subjects: Labour market; Statistics; Students;

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Evaluation of the TAFE component of the Salisbury City Council job training and job placement programme

The project evaluated the [Technical and Further Education] TAFE component of the Salisbury City Council job training and job placement programme which was provided under the [Department of Technical and Further Education] DTAFE's 1983 Commonwealth funded school to work transition programme. The programme was jointly sponsored by DTAFE, the Department of Labour and Salisbury City Council. It provided an opportunity for unemployed young people to progress from TAFE training to 17 weeks job placement, in various occupations in local government. Nineteen young unemployed people participated in the programme. The programme provided participants with basic skills. The short length of the course restricted the development of higher level skills. The majority of respondent groups commented on the positive benefits of the personal development training on participants' attitudes and performance. A longer familiarisation period was required at Council for students. A college induction period (before course commencement) was required to enable participants to become fully familiar with the TAFE college environment, staff development, in particular familiarisation with the work environment of the students should be included in future programmes. Trainees were generally positive about the overall education/training job placement model.

The project evaluated the [Technical and Further Education] TAFE component of the Salisbury City Council job training and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: South Australia. Department of Technical and Further Education (DTAFE)
Date: 1984
Geographic subjects: South Australia; Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Evaluation; Youth; Employment;

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The first year of Accelerating Opportunity: implementation findings from the states and colleges

Beginning in 2012, the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative provided $1.6 million in grants to five US states [Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Louisiana]. The grants were to help community colleges create career pathway programs to enroll students with low basic skills into for-credit career and technical education courses to improve their educational and employment outcomes. A rigorous and comprehensive evaluation of AO includes a non-experimental impact study, an implementation study, and a cost-benefit analysis. This first report provides key findings on the pathways, students, resources, partnerships, culture shifts, and policy developments from the first year of implementation of the initiative.

Beginning in 2012, the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative provided $1.6 million in grants to five US states [Illinois, ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Anderson, Theresa; Eyster, Lauren; Lerman, Robert I.;
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: North America; United States
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Higher education; Skills and knowledge;

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Total vocational education and training (VET) activity data collection: COAG decision regulation impact statement

The purpose of this decision regulation impact statement (RIS) is to enable the Council of Australian Governments' (COAG) Standing Council on Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment (SCOTESE), which includes representation from all states/territories as well as New Zealand, to determine whether to collect and publish data regarding nationally recognised vocational education and training (VET) activity from all registered training organisations (RTOs) in Australia. For the purposes of this RIS, references to VET refer to nationally recognised training delivered by registered training organisations (RTOs). It is proposed to amend the Data Provision Requirements (DPR) and the Australian Quality Training Framework (AQTF) to mandate reporting by 2600 providers not already doing so.

The purpose of this decision regulation impact statement (RIS) is to enable the Council of Australian Governments' (COAG) ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE)
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Paper
Series name: COAG regulation impact statement
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Statistics; Providers of education and training;

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The Year 9 class of 1995 in 2004

This report provides details of the experiences of the 1995 Year 9 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth [LSAY]. Information on this cohort was first collected in 1995, when these young people were Year 9 students in Australian schools. The reference period for this report is 2004, when the modal age of respondents was 23 years. Highlights in the report include: one-fifth of cohort members were participating in study during 2004, a decrease from 27 per cent in 2003 - much of this decrease is because cohort members are at an age at which they are completing their post-secondary study; 13 per cent were studying at a university and three per cent at a TAFE institution; another four per cent were undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship or another form of study, such as short courses or individual units; a greater percentage of females (47 per cent) than males (42 per cent) had completed a post-secondary qualification such as a university degree, TAFE diploma, apprenticeship or traineeship, while a greater proportion of males than females were in apprenticeships; 80 per cent of the cohort were not studying in 2004, with 36 per cent having completed a qualification and another 20 per cent having participated in other forms of study, such as short courses and single modules, since having left secondary school; overall, 88 per cent of cohort members were employed, with 73 per cent working full-time and 14 per cent working part-time; approximately four per cent of cohort members were unemployed (that is, they were not employed and were looking for work) at the time they were interviewed; most members of the cohort were happy with their lives; as in previous years, they were least happy with the state of the economy and the running of the country.

This report provides details of the experiences of the 1995 Year 9 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Underwood, Catherine
Date: 2005
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Report
Series name: LSAY cohort report
Subjects: Youth; Apprenticeship; Traineeship;

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Work-family balance: perspectives from higher education

The article examines different types of work-family pressures amongst people working within the Australian university sector. [The authors] were specifically interested in work-family experiences between domestic and migrant Australians. Among the major findings, domestic Australians experience greater levels of work-family imbalance across most of the measures used. Limitations and implications for future research are discussed.

The article examines different types of work-family pressures amongst people working within the Australian university ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Pillay, Soma; Abhayawansa, Subhash
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Victoria; Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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A long-run view of the university gender gap in Australia

The first Australian universities were established in the 1850s, well before the introduction of compulsory schooling. However it was not until the 20th century that growing industrialisation, technological change and the development of the so-called 'knowledge industries' fed into an increased demand in Australia for better-educated workers. As the 20th century progressed, technological change and industrial restructuring saw a shift from brawn to brain. From the middle of the 20th century, the introduction of mass secondary school education and the expansion of the number of universities widened access. At the same time, subjects offered in higher education increased in scope, and explicit and implicit labour market discrimination began to be eroded. These factors, together with a series of supply-side changes, meant that women were more easily able to shift into investing in the skills in which labour demand was increasing. By 1987, Australian women were more likely than men to be enrolled at university. These aggregate figures disguise considerable heterogeneity across fields of study.

The first Australian universities were established in the 1850s, well before the introduction of compulsory schooling. ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Booth, Alison L.; Kee, Hiau Joo
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Discussion paper
Series name: IZA discussion paper
Subjects: Higher education; Gender; Equity;

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Tackling early leaving from education and training in Europe: strategies, policies and measures

This joint Eurydice/Cedefop report sheds light on early leaving from education and training - a serious challenge in many European Union (EU) countries. The report aims to add value to Member States' individual efforts as well as to the European Commission's endeavours in this area by monitoring developments in the design and implementation of strategies, policies and measures to combat early leaving and support student learning. Key areas addressed are: data collection, strategies and policies against early leaving, the role of education and career guidance, governance and cross-sector cooperation and early leaving from the perspective of vocational education and training. All EU Member States are covered as well as Iceland, Norway, Switzerland and Turkey.

This joint Eurydice/Cedefop report sheds light on early leaving from education and training - a serious challenge in many ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: European Education Information Network (EURYDICE)
European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training (Cedefop)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe; Iceland; Norway;
Resource type: Report
Series name: Eurydice and Cedefop report
Subjects: Participation; Policy; Youth;

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The Year 9 class of 1995 in 2003

This report provides details of the experiences of the 1995 Year 9 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth [LSAY]. Information on this cohort was first collected in 1995, when these young people were Year 9 students in Australian schools. The reference period for this report is 2003, when the modal age of respondents was 22 years. Highlights in the report include: 27 per cent of cohort members were engaged in study during 2003, a decrease from 36 per cent in 2002 - much of this decrease is because cohort members are at an age at which they are completing their post-secondary study; 18 per cent were located at a university, four per cent at a TAFE institution; another five per cent were undertaking an apprenticeship or traineeship or another form of study, such as short courses or individual units; a greater percentage of females than males had completed a post-secondary qualification such as a university degree, TAFE diploma or apprenticeship or traineeship, while a greater proportion of males than females were in apprenticeships; the majority of the cohort were not studying in 2003, with 30 per cent having completed a qualification and another 22 per cent having participated in other forms of study, such as short courses and single modules, since having left secondary school; overall, 85 per cent of cohort members were employed, with 65 per cent working full-time and 20 per cent working part-time; approximately six per cent of cohort members were unemployed (that is, they were not employed and were looking for work) at the time they were interviewed; most members of the cohort were happy with their lives; as in previous years, they were least happy with the state of the economy and the running of the country.

This report provides details of the experiences of the 1995 Year 9 cohort of the Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Rothman, Sheldon; Underwood, Catherine
Date: 2005
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Report
Series name: LSAY cohort report
Subjects: Youth; Apprenticeship; Traineeship;

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