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Advancing ambitions: the role of career guidance in supporting social mobility

Career guidance describes activities which support individuals to learn about education and employment and plan for their future lives, learning and work. The authors of this report argue that these activities contribute to social mobility, helping people to discover and access opportunities that might exist outside of their immediate networks. They also encourage individuals to challenge their pre-existing assumptions about what they are capable of and to develop practical strategies to operationalise their aspirations. This study explores the relationship between career guidance and social mobility. It seeks to answer the following questions: What can career guidance contribute to social mobility? How have the policies of the UK coalition government impacted upon the provision of career guidance in state schools and colleges in England? What does quality career guidance look like? What evidence is there of the impact of quality career guidance? These questions were explored through a four-stage methodology comprising: (1) policy analysis and literature review, (2) gathering the core sample, (3) data analysis, and (4) case studies and interviews. This report follows the same format.

Career guidance describes activities which support individuals to learn about education and employment and plan for their ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Hooley, Tristram; Matheson, Jesse; Watts, Anthony G.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: England; Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Equity; Career development; Providers of education and training;

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Making performance accountability work: English lessons for US community colleges

In the United States, efforts to use performance accountability as a way to drive improvement in public higher education institutions and systems have yielded mixed results. A more encouraging story has unfolded in England. There, a nationwide accountability system for further education colleges - England's community-college counterparts - has led to impressive increases in student outcomes since it was implemented in 1992. Students from disadvantaged backgrounds have made particularly large gains. [This report] takes a detailed look at the policy innovations in England. For US policymakers, they provide both reason for caution and guidance for designing and implementing better performance measurement and funding systems.

In the United States, efforts to use performance accountability as a way to drive improvement in public higher education ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Jaquette, Ozan
Date: 2006
Geographic subjects: Europe; Great Britain; England;
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Performance; Outcomes;

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Adults learning, vol. 26, no. 1, Autumn 2014

This issue focuses on 'Learning through life', the main report from the independent Inquiry into the Future for Lifelong Learning, sponsored by NIACE in 2009, which examined the future for lifelong learning in the UK. The various contributions ask what has changed since the report's publication and assess its legacy and relevance five years on. The articles are: Learning through life: how far have we come? / David Watson and Tom Schuller (pages 6-9); Learning through life: where now for lifelong learning?: Recommendation one: base lifelong learning policy on a new four-stage model of the educational life course / Karen Evans (pages 10-12); Recommendation two: rebalance resources fairly and sensibly across the different life stages / Stephen McNair (pages 12-14); Recommendation three: build a set of learning entitlements / Tom Wilson (page 15); Recommendation four: engineering flexibility: a system of credit and encouraging part-timers / Claire Callender (pages 16-18); Recommendation five: improve the quality of work / Ewart Keep (pages 19-20); Recommendation six: construct a curriculum framework for citizens' capabilities / Ruth Spellman (page 21); Recommendation seven: broaden and strengthen the capacity of the lifelong learning workforce / Jim Crawley (pages 22-23); Recommendation eight: revive local responsibility... / Keith Wakefield (pages 23-24); Recommendation nine: ... within national frameworks / John Field (pages 24-25); Recommendation 10: make the system intelligent / Mark Ravenhall (pages 26-27); Lifelong waiting / Alan Tuckett (pages 28-29); A manifesto for lasting change / Tom Stannard (pages 30-31).

This issue focuses on 'Learning through life', the main report from the independent Inquiry into the Future for Lifelong ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (England and Wales) (NIACE)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Journal issue
Subjects: Adult and community education; Lifelong learning; Policy;

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Entrepreneurial intentions of students at further education and training colleges in South Africa

The relevance of entrepreneurship is underscored in the public policy domain where a wide range of government policies support the development of entrepreneurship, with further education and training (FET) colleges seen as critical role-players. Research has shown that entrepreneurship education increases students' self-confidence and overall attitudes, which in turn increases their perceptions of feasibility and desirability of pursuing entrepreneurship as a career. Recognising that the challenge for FET colleges is to ensure that graduates are also equipped for self-employment, this study investigated the entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) of final year FET college students in four provinces. Statistical analysis revealed high levels of EIs amongst differing groups irrespective of personal (gender) or contextual attributes (in urban vs. rural vs. metro-township FET colleges). Implications can be advanced to the policy domain where it needs to be stressed that government initiatives will affect entrepreneurship development only if these policies are perceived in a way that influences individuals' EIs, in particular their conviction, as characterised by general attitudes towards entrepreneurship.

The relevance of entrepreneurship is underscored in the public policy domain where a wide range of government policies ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Skosana, B. V.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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Lifelong learning, higher education and the development of learning communities

This set of recent papers reflects the work of the author and compiles concepts and ideas, policies and tensions associated with adult education and lifelong learning, and the role of higher education in contemporary societies. The publication is aimed at two audiences in particular, the first being Hungary and the other being the rest of Europe. The papers are as follows: Global-local, economic-civic: trends in HE and LLL from a Hungarian perspective [preface by Chris Duke]; The perspectives of adult education for countries in Central-Eastern Europe: historical and political dimensions and patterns; Lifelong learning, social movements and policy, fighting back poverty and social exclusion; In the building of an active citizen: the crossing of aims of liberal politics and of urban adult education movements at the turn of the 19th and 20th century Hungary: a tribute to Franz Poggeler; Learning cities, regions and learning communities: some characteristics of the development of the Pecs Learning City-Region Forum and the messages of the Pure Project; New forms of mobility in higher education: developments in the European Masters of Adult Education (EMAE) and the innovation potential of Eurolocal and R3L+ projects; Making higher education to open up to adult learners: an actual issue for quality education: CONFINTEA VI follow up and role of university lifelong learning: some issues for European higher education; Is there a chance for roles of higher education in the development of a 'learning climate' through regional development in Hungary?; Country report on the action plan on adult learning: Hungary; Country report on the action plan on adult learning: Romania.

This set of recent papers reflects the work of the author and compiles concepts and ideas, policies and tensions associated ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Nemeth, Balazs
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe; Romania; Hungary
Resource type: Book
Subjects: Lifelong learning; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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ACT training profile 2001: information on VET as agreed under the ANTA Agreement of 1998

The contents are: Part 1 - Vocational training and education activity; Part 2 - ACT responses to 2001 annual national priorities of the national strategy for vocational education and training 1998-2003 'A bridge to the future'; Part 3 - Progress report on responses to 2000 annual national priorities of the national strategy for vocational education and training 1998-2003 'A bridge to the future'; Part 4 - Projected levels of regulated training activity; Part 5 - VET in Schools; Part 6 - Literacy and numeracy; Part 7 - Contestable funding allocation; Part 8 - Adult and community education ACE; Part 9 - Capital development plan; Part 10 - Growth through efficiencies plan amendments; Appendix A - Activity tables with activity reported in annual scheduled curriculum hours.

The contents are: Part 1 - Vocational training and education activity; Part 2 - ACT responses to 2001 annual national ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australian Capital Territory. Department of Education and Community Services. Office of Training and Adult Education (OTAE)
Date: 2003
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia; Australian Capital Territory
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Governance; Performance;

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Kei Hea re Tuna?: Maori and Pacific Island young people's experiences of education employment linkages: two case studies

Building on previous research in the Education Employment Linkages (EEL) programme, this study was on Maori and Pacific Island young people's experiences and perceptions of transitions beyond school, especially for those young people who had left school with few or no qualifications. The overarching aim of the project was to privilege Maori and Pacific Island young people voices. The project consisted of two case studies and looked at the EEL experiences and perceptions of young Maori and Pacific Island people in both urban and provincial settings. Case study one rangatahi [youth] had left school early with no or few qualifications but had enrolled in a private training establishment (PTE) to further their education. The rangatahi in case study two had left school later than the rangatahi in case study one with at least [New Zealand Certificate of Educational Achievement] NZCEA Level One, and at the time of the research were not in employment but were actively looking for work. The rangatahi experienced considerable challenges, both in their schools and the labour market. The social and educational marginalisation that they experienced impacted on their access to educational and labour market outcomes and opportunities. Despite their school experiences the rangatahi valued education and saw it as means to realising their aspirations. While they opted out of school they opted back into learning in post-secondary training and education organisations. As alternative sites of learning the PTEs provided the rangatahi in case study one with positive and successful learning experiences. The rangatahi in case study two challenged the commonly held view of [not in employment, education or training] NEET youth as disengaged and 'at risk'; rather they were engaged and connected into their communities in their pursuit to find work. All the rangatahi were optimistic about their futures and they drew on their whanau [extended family], friendship networks and communities to enhance their learning and work opportunities.

Building on previous research in the Education Employment Linkages (EEL) programme, this study was on Maori and Pacific ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Phillips, Hazel; Mitchell, Moana
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Series name: EEL research report
Subjects: Youth; Indigenous people; Employment;

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Employability deconstructed: perceptions of Bologna stakeholders

The paper analyses employability as a floating signifier - a construct that accommodates different and often contending meanings. A preliminary analysis of scholarly literature identifies two opposing interpretations of employability: an individual responsibility versus a comprehensive context-aware construct. These are subsequently applied to the discourse of the major interests in the Bologna Process: policy-makers; institutions and academics; students; and employers. Their standpoints are examined from two dimensions: how far is responsibility for employability individualised?; and what is higher education's role in fostering employability? As a concept, employability commands little consensus. Rather, it is interpreted in the light of each interest group's concerns. As to higher education's role, utilitarianism characterises all but academic actors' views. Applying the concept of a floating signifier to employability as it is debated within the Bologna Process - a policy arena for competing interest groups to dispute meaning - reveals a finer, more nuanced understanding of how policy comes to be and, in particular, the importance of discourse and conflicts over meaning as factors intrinsic to it.

The paper analyses employability as a floating signifier - a construct that accommodates different and often contending ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Sin, Cristina; Neave, Guy
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe
Journal title: Studies in higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Policy; Higher education;

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Professional bodies and quality assurance of higher education programmes in South Africa: towards an appropriate framework

Collaboration between universities and professional bodies is neither new nor unique to South Africa. It occurs in many higher education systems and revolves around the role that professional bodies play in the quality assurance and accreditation of the relevant higher education programmes. In South Africa, this relationship has become increasingly problematic over the recent past due to a number of factors. This article begins by exploring those factors before highlighting the legal framework governing the role of professional bodies in higher education programmes. A critique of the said role is then undertaken against the backdrop of views and opinions from academics involved in professional programmes at some South African universities, including the thorny issue of who should meet the costs of accreditation. The article concludes with suggestions on the principles that should underpin a revised framework, under the custodianship of the Council for Higher Education (CHE), to govern the relationship between universities and professional bodies.

Collaboration between universities and professional bodies is neither new nor unique to South Africa. It occurs in many ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ballim, Y.; Mabizela, S.; Mubangizi, J. C.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Governance;

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Promoting a culture of student success: how colleges and universities are improving degree completion

Despite rising college enrollment, improvement in students' timely completion of bachelor's degrees in the United States has stalled. Student success rates are alarmingly low and have not changed significantly in many years: fewer than one-third of degree-seeking, full-time freshmen in public four-year institutions graduate in four years. Most students who enter college as first-time, full-time freshmen take at least six years to earn a bachelor's degree - and only 55 per cent graduate in that time span. Clearly, the nation's success in attracting more students to college has not been matched by success in graduating them. In fact, research shows that students from disadvantaged economic backgrounds or with low SAT/ACT scores are even less likely to complete bachelor's degrees than their classmates. Some colleges and universities, however, are helping more students complete degrees while also providing a high-quality education. These institutions often serve a comparatively high percentage of students from low-income families and students with average-or-below scores on standardized achievement tests. Yet their six-year graduation rates are near the national average for all students. These colleges and universities are the focus of this report.

Despite rising college enrollment, improvement in students' timely completion of bachelor's degrees in the United States has ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bradley, A. Paul; Blanco, Cheryl; Richard, Alan
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Participation; Outcomes; Providers of education and training;

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