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Exploring teacher professional learning for future-oriented schooling

The last 15 years or so have seen a paradigm shift in international thinking about education. To thrive in today's world, people need new kinds of knowledge and skills. There is a large literature on how schools need to change if they are to provide this, and New Zealand's national curriculum is designed to support this change. While there is some work on how to support students' learning in the new context, there is as yet little knowledge of how best to support the significant changes in teacher thinking that are required for schools to meet the needs of the future. This working paper sets out some of the early findings from a pilot project to explore the qualities that such future-oriented teachers might need and how those qualities might be developed. The work began under a New Zealand Council for Educational Research (NZCER) project called 'Back to the future' and is now part of a project funded by the Teaching and Learning Research Initiative (TLRI) called 'On the edge: shifting teachers' paradigms for the future'.

The last 15 years or so have seen a paradigm shift in international thinking about education. To thrive in today's world, ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Gilbert, Jane; Bull, Ally
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Oceania
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: Back to the Future project working paper
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Skills and knowledge; Workforce development;

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Embedding quality culture in higher education: a selection of papers from the 1st European Forum for Quality Assurance

This publication provides a representative sample of papers presented at this forum, mostly focusing on institutional case studies displaying ways in which institutions, students and quality assurance agencies ensure quality. The papers are as follows: Higher education and quality assessment: the many rationales for quality / Alberto Amaral; Quality assurance and the Bologna and Lisbon objectives / Eric Froment; What is quality? / Jethro Newton; Dealing with ambivalences: strategic options for nurturing a quality culture in teaching and learning / Oliver Vettori, Manfred Lueger and Monika Knassmuller; Steering by engagement: towards an integrated planning and evaluation framework in higher education institutes / Deirdre Lillis; Instruments for raising quality culture in a network of universities / Karin Fischer-Bluhm; Promotion of quality culture in international cooperation with special focus on joint programmes / Axel Hunger and Ina Skalbergs; Student involvement in university life and quality processes: results of thematic audit on student involvement in university governance and decision-making / Andy Gibbs and Christina Ashton; Student participation in [quality assurance] QA: strengths and challenges / Sanja Brus, Janja Komljenovic, Daithi Mac Sithigh, Geert Noope and Colin Tuck; Impact of quality processes / Bjorn Stensaker; The impact of quality culture on quality of teaching: a case of business higher education in Poland / Anetta Kowalkiewicz; Embedding graduate survey indicators into internal quality assurance systems: what can institutions learn from graduate surveys? / Anna Prades and Sebastian Rodriguez; Practice and effects of self-evaluation in the institutional evaluation processes of [Centre National d'Entrainement] CNE: a study based on 17 evaluation reports of higher education institutions of Ile-de-France / Fabrice Henard.

This publication provides a representative sample of papers presented at this forum, mostly focusing on institutional case ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bollaert, Lucien; Brus, Sanja; Curvale, Bruno;
Conference name: European Forum for Quality Assurance
Date: 2006
Geographic subjects: Europe; France; Poland
Resource type: Conference
Series name: EUA case studies
Subjects: Quality; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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Theorising research with vulnerable people in higher education: ethical and methodological challenges

University students experience varying forms of vulnerability, which could have negative consequences for fulfilling their academic potential. The voices of these vulnerable students have not been adequately captured in existing research and can be best sought through qualitative research which targets the very students experiencing such vulnerabilities. This article, framed within the conceptual theory of vulnerability, uses Narrative Theory as a methodological approach to explore how university students experience the phenomenon of being at risk; how they cope with it; and how their narratives of vulnerability can inform student retention and support in higher education institutions (HEIs). Being at risk is a multidimensional concept, which is dealt with inadequately in institutional ethics policy and practice. The preliminary findings suggested that students at risk feel marginalised [from] mainstream support services. Further, the evidence suggested that doctoral students' training reproduces the marginalisation of vulnerability through inadequately addressing ways of researching with vulnerable people.

University students experience varying forms of vulnerability, which could have negative consequences for fulfilling their ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Maringe, Felix; Sing, Nevensha
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Participation; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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Improving the quality and productivity of the higher education sector: policy and strategy for systems-level deployment of learning analytics

This discussion paper responds to the high level of investment higher education leaders are currently making in data analytics. Australian higher education institutions are devoting considerable resources to better understand the factors that impact student retention and success. The imperative for developing a national learning analytics policy and strategy that evaluates current international practice and proposes key enabling suggestions to guide education executives and government officials in future decision making is presented. The need for a more coordinated and systemic approach arises from pressures surrounding quality assurance and reporting mechanisms, increased student diversity and mobility, budgetary constraints and establishing a competitive advantage for Australian universities within the global education market.

This discussion paper responds to the high level of investment higher education leaders are currently making in data ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Siemens, George; Dawson, Shane; Lynch, Grace
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania; Great Britain;
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Research; Providers of education and training;

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Quality assurance of teacher education in Africa

This publication attempts to contribute to bridging the existing knowledge gap in relation to mechanisms of quality assurance of teacher education in Africa. It starts with the evolution of the concept of quality of education in general and goes on to discuss the teachers' role in improving the quality. It highlights indicators for identifying effective teachers and the factors that determine the quality in teacher education so that the appropriate mechanisms of assurance can be derived from these factors. The publication identifies three mechanisms for quality assurance of a teacher education institution in terms of programme or as a course. It discusses in details, the implementation of the process of accreditation in the context of teacher education at different levels specifying the criteria of accreditation, giving the steps to set up a quality assurance agency and its management including the challenges of the accreditation process. It has also collected examples of quality assurance of teacher education in Africa, which are limited to quality audit and quality assessment. These form a part of the initial process of accreditation. The publication attempts to improve upon the mechanisms of quality assurance through accreditation to derive the benefits it could provide. It concludes by recommending a set of strategies for the government, the accreditation agency and the teacher educational institutions for successful implementation of the accreditation process for quality assurance of teacher education in Africa.

This publication attempts to contribute to bridging the existing knowledge gap in relation to mechanisms of quality ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Sanyal, Bikas C.
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Africa
Resource type: Book
Series name: Fundamentals of teacher education development
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Teaching and learning; Quality;

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Distance learning in adult basic education: a review of the literature

The purpose of this literature review is to provide background information about distance learning (DL) in adult basic education (ABE), specifically, to identify program design and policy implications to inform the use of [distance education] DE for [general educational development] GED students in rural Pennsylvania. Adult educators have long sought to encourage greater participation in, and more equitable access to, educational opportunities for adult learners. This literature review examines how DE can help adult educators address issues of equity and participation, especially in rural areas with restricted educational opportunities. In Pennsylvania, for example, rural residents tend to have lower educational attainment and more limited access to adult education services than their urban counterparts.

The purpose of this literature review is to provide background information about distance learning (DL) in adult basic ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Gungor, Ramazan; Prins, Esther
Date: 2011
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Research; Adult and community education;

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Disruptive education: technology-enabled universities

This report examines technology-enabled higher education in general, with a focus on massive open online courses (MOOCs) in particular. Australia's successful export model of international education has come under stress since the global financial crisis, with improved quality in overseas universities and a high Australian dollar diminishing Australia's advantages over universities in other English-speaking countries. Changing technology may offer other opportunities for Australian universities to grow and engage with clients.

This report examines technology-enabled higher education in general, with a focus on massive open online courses (MOOCs) in ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Gallagher, Sean; Garrett, Geoffrey
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Technology; Higher education; Teaching and learning;

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The role of universities in the regions

The existence of regional universities offers students in the regions the opportunity to study within easy access of their families and support structures. The opportunities and the employment these institutions create help to keep the regions alive. Some have suggested that regional universities should be teaching only institutions, or outposts of metropolitan universities. There are equally strong views advocating that research is essential in the regions, as is the maintenance of independence of such institutions so that regional focus and benefits can be assured. A downgrading by stealth or neglect of universities in regional and rural Australia would be economically disastrous, politically problematic to any party seeking government in this country and counter the bipartisan pursuit of equity through education that has traditionally characterised and inspired Australian advances.

The existence of regional universities offers students in the regions the opportunity to study within easy access of their ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Winchester, Hilary; Glenn, Andrew; Thomas, Paul;
Date: 2000
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Demographics; Higher education; Providers of education and training

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Building research supervision and training across Australian universities: final report

'Building research supervision and training in Australian universities' was undertaken with the aims of identifying existing higher degree research supervisor training provisions; identifying current and future needs of supervisors and making recommendations that assist universities in their ongoing development of effective higher degree research supervisor training. The project provides evidence that pressures within universities for increasing professionalisation and formalisation of research education have resulted in supervision of research students becoming more transparent and accountable, and supervisory practices becoming increasingly subject to scrutiny. A major finding from the project is that, with these changes, there is a need for increasingly sophisticated and constructive conversations about supervision pedagogy that engage all supervisors, both new and more experienced. Such conversations need to go beyond issues of compliance to address quality of supervision and good supervisory practices. A further finding from the project is that there is a need in many universities for greater emphasis on professional leadership in research education.

'Building research supervision and training in Australian universities' was undertaken with the aims of identifying existing ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Hammond, Jennifer; Ryland, Kevin; Tennant, Mark;
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Qualifications;

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Do National Senior Certificate results predict first-year optometry students’ academic performance at university?

Matriculation results have previously been used as reasonable predictors of first-year students’ academic performance at university. Although there have been some improvements in access to education for many South Africans, the quality of the National Senior Certificate (NSC) introduced in 2008 remains uncertain. The purpose of the study reported on was to determine whether matriculation subjects’ scores can be predictors of students’ academic success in the first year of the Bachelor of Optometry (BOptom) programme. The files of 84 first-year optometry students who wrote the NSC examination from 2009-2011 were reviewed and their matriculation scores were recorded. These scores were compared to their results in modules in their first-year BOptom programme. There was a weak correlation between students’ matriculation and first-year optometry results. Overall, the matriculation scores showed a weak correlation between the first semester average and overall first-year marks. Thus, the study found that NSC scores cannot be used as sole predictors of students’ academic success in the first year of the BOptom programme.

Matriculation results have previously been used as reasonable predictors of first-year students’ academic performance at ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Mashige, Khathutshelo P.; Rampersad, Nish; Venkatas, Irene S.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Participation; Outcomes; Providers of education and training;

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