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Higher Education and Research Reform Amendment Bill 2014 [Provisions]

This Senate inquiry examined the Higher Education and Research Reform Amendment Bill 2014, recommends it be passed, and makes several further recommendations. This bill was introduced in the House of Representatives on 28 August 2014. On 4 September 2014 the Senate referred the provisions of the bill to the Senate Education and Employment Legislation Committee for inquiry and report by 28 October 2014. Details of the inquiry were made available on the committee's website. The committee also contacted a number of organisations inviting submissions to the inquiry. Submissions were received from 164 individuals and organisations. The bill seeks to reform higher education in Australia by deregulating fees and extending funding to higher education qualifications below the bachelor degree level, as well as to private universities and non-university higher education providers.

This Senate inquiry examined the Higher Education and Research Reform Amendment Bill 2014, recommends it be passed, and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Parliament. Senate. Education and Employment Legislation Committee
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Governance; Finance;

VITAL Object

Gender and tertiary education: is it useful to talk about male disadvantage?

Internationally there is much research showing that achievement within the education sector is a key determinant of positive labour market outcomes as well as supporting many other areas of wellbeing. Against a backdrop of overall strong and very positive improvements in educational participation and achievement, there is evidence that a gendered 'education transition' has taken place in New Zealand. The transition in tertiary education is demonstrated by higher rates of participation and achievement of women relative to men, particularly among the Maori and Pacific communities. Does this transition matter? Certainly in the past higher participation and achievement by men prompted much concern about the need for women to improve their relative outcomes. While now there is some concern expressed about boys' achievement within schooling, the same level of disquiet is not being expressed about the relative underperformance of men in tertiary education. In this sector concerns focus on overall Maori and Pacific under-representation, and there is still attention given to female under-representation in areas such as engineering or building. Is this because the gaps that favour women are minor differences or, in fact, are they new and important disparities? The authors find there is no objective measure that can indicate when gender gaps are important. However, historically gaps of the size currently found in tertiary education, but in favour of men, did cause concern. And currently similar sized gaps, again in favour of men, in areas such as pay continue to be high on public policy agendas. Further complicating this analysis of gaps is whether absolute gains to both men and women are considered, or whether simply relative positions are examined. Overall, the paper suggests that much of the gender analysis undertaken within the tertiary education sector, as well as within much of the wider policy world, remains based on a premise of female disadvantage or, alternatively, focuses on very specific areas of female disadvantage while often ignoring parallel male disadvantage. Focusing on one part of a binary population, without looking at the other part, has the potential to create new inequalities. The authors suggest that this needs to change to allow a more sophisticated analysis of gender and ethnic gaps. This includes a requirement to consider the growing heterogeneity of choices and outcomes for women and men, as well as identifying and overcoming the remaining constraints on choice for both men and women.

Internationally there is much research showing that achievement within the education sector is a key determinant of positive ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Callister, Paul; Leather, Frances; Holt, Jill
Date: 2008
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Oceania
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: Institute of Policy Studies working paper
Subjects: Gender; Higher education; Participation;

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Gender and tertiary education enrolments and completions: an overview of trends 1994-2006

This working paper provides a broad overview of trends in tertiary education enrolments and completions for women and men from 1994 to 2006. In measuring differences in outcomes between women and men in education, both participation and performance are important. Enrolments are a measure of participation and completions are a basic, but important, measure of performance. The data are drawn from the Ministry of Education's database on enrolments and completions. While gender is the key variable considered, ethnicity, age, level of study, main areas of study, whether the study was full time or part time and type of institution are all considered. The paper also includes some basic education outcome data from the 2006 census of population and dwellings.

This working paper provides a broad overview of trends in tertiary education enrolments and completions for women and men ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Callister, Paul; Newell, James
Date: 2008
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Oceania
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: Institute of Policy Studies working paper
Subjects: Gender; Higher education; Outcomes;

VITAL Object

National Medical Training Advisory Network

Australia's medical workforce is highly skilled and provides vital services that are the foundation of a high-quality healthcare system that includes both patient care and medical training. The Australian healthcare system has evolved over time to include different models of care, including a focus on primary and community care and an increase in care in the private system. Demographic changes and a range of government initiatives, including broader reforms to the health and higher education sectors will further influence the provision of healthcare in Australia, including how and where doctors are trained. Australia's medical training system has numerous participants and no single body is responsible for the funding and delivery of medical training. Implementation of a coordinated medical training pathway that delivers a better balance across the medical specialty workforces and meets community need will benefit Australia. Planning of the Australian medical workforce is essential to ensure the local training and service requirements of jurisdictions, local hospital networks, and private and non-government employers are balanced with the training of doctors as a national health system resource. The National Medical Training Advisory Network (NMTAN) is a mechanism that will enable, for the first time, a nationally coordinated medical training system in Australia.

Australia's medical workforce is highly skilled and provides vital services that are the foundation of a high-quality ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Health Workforce Australia (HWA)
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Industry; Workforce development; Skills and knowledge;

VITAL Object

The factors affecting the supply of health services and medical professionals in rural areas

This report summarises the findings of the inquiry that was undertaken as per the stated terms of reference, i.e. the factors affecting the supply and distribution of health services and medical professionals in rural areas, with particular reference to: (a) the factors limiting the supply of health services and medical, nursing and allied health professionals to small regional communities as compared with major regional and metropolitan centres; (b) the effect of the introduction of Medicare Locals on the provision of medical services in rural areas; (c) current incentive programs for recruitment and retention of doctors and dentists, particularly in smaller rural communities, including: (i) their role, structure and effectiveness, (ii) the appropriateness of the delivery model, and (iii) whether the application of the current Australian Standard Geographical Classification – Remoteness Areas classification scheme ensures appropriate distribution of funds and delivers intended outcomes; and (d) any other related matters.

This report summarises the findings of the inquiry that was undertaken as per the stated terms of reference, i.e. the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Parliament. Senate. Community Affairs References Committee
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Industry; Workforce development; Higher education;

VITAL Object

DEET reviews the last ten years of higher education

[The author] reviews the recently published report of the Department of Employment, Education and Training, 'National report on Australia's higher education sector'. [He considers] the evaluative aspects of historical analysis that a government report cannot undertake and poses a number of research questions that arise from the data supplied in the report.

[The author] reviews the recently published report of the Department of Employment, Education and Training, 'National report ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Johnson, Richard
Date: 1993
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Unicorn: journal of the Australian College of Education
Resource type: Article
Series name: Special issue on training reform (Unicorn: journal of the Australian College of Education)
Subjects: Higher education; Governance; Policy;

VITAL Object

Paying our way: a look at student financial assistance usage in Ontario

Students in Ontario face the highest tuition fees in the country and the cost and perceived costs of post-secondary education are consistently identified as barriers to post-secondary education. These barriers are contributing factors to the persistently high attainment gaps for various vulnerable groups in pursuing an undergraduate degree. This report highlights that while a majority (60 per cent) of students are applying for government assistance, assistance from the government is not always sufficient to finance the cost of a post-secondary education. Indeed, two-thirds of students were concerned that they would not have enough money to complete their post-secondary education. The findings suggest that there may be gaps within the Ontario Student Assistance Program (OSAP) that need to be addressed to ensure that the affordability and accessibility of university in Ontario is retained for all students, regardless of their financial reality.

Students in Ontario face the highest tuition fees in the country and the cost and perceived costs of post-secondary ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bristow, Aisla; Nestico-Semianiw, Spencer
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Report
Series name: 2014 what students want report
Subjects: Finance; Higher education; Economics;

VITAL Object

Evaluation report: 'enabling retention: processes and strategies for improving student retention in university-based enabling programs'

This formative evaluation took place during the course of the project, rather than at the conclusion, enabling the evaluator to have input throughout the entire project and increase the evaluation's effectiveness. The evaluator indicates that there were a number of problems and delays that needed to be overcome, and that the inclusive communication involved in this project assisted in the project surviving these obstacles. The evaluator was able to attend, and participate in, two of the project workshops allowing the evaluator to give early feedback to inform future presentations. The evaluator considers that the research findings and other outcomes of the project will be of value and relevance to the sector as a whole and institutions other than the participating ones.

This formative evaluation took place during the course of the project, rather than at the conclusion, enabling the evaluator ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ramsay, Eleanor
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Evaluation; Research; Higher education;

VITAL Object

Widening access to higher education in divided communities

This book is set against the backdrop of ongoing policy commitment in the UK to widening access and social mobility. It draws on papers originally presented at the 2012 Forum for Access and Continuing Education (FACE) annual conference at the University of Ulster in Derry/Londonderry. It brings together contributions offering a wide range of insights from various perspectives on the effects that different types of division have on collective efforts to widen participation in higher education. Instances of innovative practice are highlighted through comparison and case studies.

This book is set against the backdrop of ongoing policy commitment in the UK to widening access and social mobility. It ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Hill, Michael; Hudson, Anthony; Jones, Peter;
Conference name: Forum for Access and Continuing Education Annual Conference
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Book
Subjects: Higher education; Participation; Equity;

VITAL Object

Successfully transitioning to university: the influence of self-efficacy

Within the current context of offering university education to the broader socio-economic environment, there is a concern that students who have been out of the education arena for many years may not handle the rigours of university. Therefore, an even greater emphasis has been placed on upskilling through enabling programs prior to entering university. However, research that investigates the reasons for successful transition of students from enabling programs to undergraduate study is quite limited. This paper is expanding on previous research that explored the lived experiences of eight first year undergraduate students who had all completed the [Skills for Tertiary Education Preparatory Studies] STEPS enabling program, successfully transitioned and completed their first year of undergraduate study in their chosen degree. Where experiential evidence from enabling educators supports the belief that their students enter university better prepared and with a higher level of resilience, this research explores this idea from the student perspective and their lived experiences. Through the process of existential phenomenology, this research identified four themes (sense of preparedness, university as an anchor, fear of the unknown, and a sense of certainty and rightness) that ultimately demonstrate that, through mastering core skills and adopting a studious mentality with a positive attitude, these students displayed high levels of self-efficacy. This paper endeavours to show that enabling programs are in an ideal position to nurture the development of self-efficacy in their students.

Within the current context of offering university education to the broader socio-economic environment, there is a concern ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: James, Trixie
Conference name: National Association of Enabling Educators of Australia Conference
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Higher education; Teaching and learning; Skills and knowledge;

VITAL Object