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Europe's universities: main drivers in achieving the European Research Area (ERA):

Results have been achieved by [European University Association] EUA, with its large membership, in moving forward the implementation of European Research Area [ERA] policies and raising further awareness of their importance. Survey results from a representative sample of EUA membership show that [European Commission] EC ERA initiatives on researcher career conditions, open recruitment and human resources excellence are being taken up in a substantial manner. On cross-border and regional cooperation, EUA has forged an innovative partnership with the Joint Research Centre (Seville)/[Directorate General] DG Regions Smart Specialisation Platform, focusing on existing 'good practices', their experience and lessons, and how universities could enhance their contribution in developing national and regional 'Smart Specialisation Strategies' for future maximisation of the use of the [European Union] EU regional funds for research and innovation activities leading to economic and social development. Finally, EUA has worked collectively with all Stakeholder Organisations (SHOs) who on 17 July 2012 signed the Memoranda of Understanding (MoUs)/Joint Statements in achieving agreement on 'Common Principles' governing Open Access, and has presented an agenda for a high-level dialogue with scientific publishers on the need for new business models that reflect the impact of digital technological developments on the process of the production of scientific knowledge for scientific publishing. Presented here is a progress report on these achievements made by EUA in the implementation of the actions agreed in the voluntary MoU.

Results have been achieved by [European University Association] EUA, with its large membership, in moving forward the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: European University Association (EUA)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe
Resource type: Report
Series name: EUA publications
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Students;

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The price of knowledge: access and student finance in Canada

This third edition of the series provides analysis of key trends and new data relating to access to post-secondary education, student finances and financial assistance programs in Canada. It presents the latest research on key issues, such as: participation in post-secondary education: who's going, who's not going and why; the barriers that prevent individuals from pursuing higher education; student income and expenditure patterns over an academic year; how student aid options stack up, by type, level of aid and provider; the effectiveness of various types of student support; and student borrowing and debt.

This third edition of the series provides analysis of key trends and new data relating to access to post-secondary ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Berger, Joseph; Motte, Anne; Parkin, Andrew
Date: 2007
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Book
Series name: Millennium research series
Subjects: Equity; Finance; Students;

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Unemployment, education and skills constraints in post-apartheid South Africa

This paper investigates the relationship between education and unemployment in post-apartheid South Africa, and probes the argument that employment growth has been inhibited particularly by skills constraints. [The authors] use probit regression analysis to show that higher education protected against unemployment in both 1995 and 2003, and that overall, the relative benefits to tertiary education rose over the period. [The authors] show also that these aggregate trends mask substantial variation among race groups and within race groups, among men and women. However, after taking into account changes in the survey instruments used to measure employment, [the authors] find only modest evidence of skills-intensive employment growth. Rather, the increase in formally qualified labour was considerably larger than the increase in demand for skilled and semi-skilled labour over the period, and so unemployment rates even among graduates increased over the period.

This paper investigates the relationship between education and unemployment in post-apartheid South Africa, and probes the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Dias, Rosa; Posel, Dorrit
Conference name: TIPS/DPRU Forum: Accelerated and Shared Growth in South Africa
Date: 2007
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: DPRU working paper
Subjects: Higher education; Employment; Skills and knowledge;

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Applying quality principles to Australian university transnational teaching and learning

This report is of a project to apply a framework of quality principles to Australian university transnational teaching and learning, that is, to educational practices in Australian university programmes delivered and conducted 'offshore'. It is documented that the quality of Australian transnational higher education is uneven. Flawed quality puts at risk the reputation and financial security of Australian universities, the goodwill of host-countries and institutions and education's position as Australia's largest service export industry. In 2006, Australian universities called for the development of principles of quality to inform transnational teaching and learning practice. The 'Quality Principles' were subsequently developed. The project reported here transported the Principles into practice.

This report is of a project to apply a framework of quality principles to Australian university transnational teaching and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Pyvis, David
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: International education; Higher education; Quality;

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I will survive: strategies for improving lawyers' workplace satisfaction

This paper discusses proposed research on the wellbeing of Australian lawyers in the workplace. It examines what is known about workplace satisfaction for lawyers in Australia, compared with the worrying findings about the legal profession in the United States. The paper examines the likely causes of dissatisfaction including how universities traditionally teach law and what students are not told about legal practice. The authors discuss the need to investigate the wellbeing and satisfaction levels among newly admitted lawyers, and to consider ways to teach law that could help lawyers not only make wise career choices but develop strategies to cope better with stressors in their workplace. Clinical legal education could help students develop professionally as well as personally in order to improve their chances of having a happy and productive life at work.

This paper discusses proposed research on the wellbeing of Australian lawyers in the workplace. It examines what is known ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: James, Colin; Finlay-Jones, Jenny
Conference name: Asia-Pacific Educational Integrity Conference
Date: 2005
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia; North America;
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Industry; Employment; Workforce development;

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A partnership approach to work placement in higher education

There is a perceived gap between traditional university education and a readiness to enter the workforce which is often addressed by the inclusion of a work-based learning experience within the undergraduate education process. The intention of the curriculum designers is that the work placement experience will provide learners with an opportunity to develop their employability skills and to apply the knowledge that they have gained within a practice setting. This practice-focused paper summarises the work conducted under the REAP (Roadmap for Employment-Academic Partnerships) project, illustrating existing practice in work placement and gathering input and experiences from higher education staff and employers. The aim of the work was to explore practice in work placement in undergraduate programmes in Ireland and to develop an outline guide to support good practice. The importance of the work placement interaction in contributing to the development of a broader more sustainable relationship is considered briefly.

There is a perceived gap between traditional university education and a readiness to enter the workforce which is often ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Sheridan, Irene; Linehan, Margaret
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Ireland; Europe
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Students; Employment;

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Creating a collaborative learning community for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion students: enhancing access, progression and learning in higher education

The Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion (GDIHP) was established in the Sydney School of Public Health (SSPH), University of Sydney in 1998 after two years national consultation. The GDIHP aims to provide a pathway to higher education for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health workers. It also provides a globally recognised qualification, provides knowledge and skills specifically for advanced health promotion in urban, rural and remote Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander communities and prepares students for health promotion roles in mainstream settings. Participation in the GDIHP provides students with knowledge, skills and confidence to protect and develop the health of their communities, and help them progress personally, professionally and financially. This project addressed the needs of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students and teachers of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander students studying the GDIHP at the University of Sydney. By developing learning partnerships with alumni, the project brought together Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health promotion practical experience and expertise to campus and established collaborations between current students, staff, and alumni.

The Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion (GDIHP) was established in the Sydney School of Public Health (SSPH), ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Dickson, Michelle
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Indigenous people; Higher education; Vocational education and training;

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Training and human capacity development in Australasia, S. and S.E. Asia and sub-Saharan Africa

Delivery of tertiary training in Australia and New Zealand is constrained by the university funding and regulatory environment that leads to a less than ideal hybrid of North American style undergraduate training coupled to UK style research-based PhD. Strong industry, research and training sectors, however, provide steady demand for graduates, provide relevant and high-level PhD research opportunities, and supports life-long on-the-job mentoring and learning, leading to high levels of expertise. Training opportunities in Asia and Africa are much more limited, and face a wide range of challenges to delivering high quality and relevant training outcomes. Shortage of career opportunities limits the support available to research training and the development of high levels of expertise through mentoring and experience gained post-qualification. There are opportunities to improve human capacity through establishment of regional platforms in Africa but less clear in Asia.

Delivery of tertiary training in Australia and New Zealand is constrained by the university funding and regulatory ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Gibson, J. P.; Rege, J. E. O.; Chagunda, M. G. G.
Conference name: World Congress of Genetics Applied to Livestock Production
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Africa; Asia; Australia;
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Higher education; Workforce development; Qualifications;

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Resource sharing in regional tertiary education

The project sought to enrich student learning and regional student participation by identifying models of collaboration between the TAFE and [higher education] HE that could provide the best opportunities for viable education provision in regional Australia. The environmental scan and preliminary collaboration selection process indicated that numerous collaboration activities often had little depth with little suggestion of physical resource sharing. Of the case studies chosen for analysis with the exception of an exemplar model (Model Two) evidence supported the preliminary scan impressions that the two sectors have minimal success in sharing human resources. Model Two could be considered as an exemplar model, with all identified enablers leveraged to deliver a world class outcome within an operational context that displayed a unified brand image, linking two institutions, each with strong reputations, who place a high value on their staff and who are both committed to making the collaboration work. However, the objectives of this study were concerned with regional higher education and as Model Two relates to a metropolitan context, the ability to lever all the enablers may be limited.

The project sought to enrich student learning and regional student participation by identifying models of collaboration ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Nagy, Judy
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Demographics; Vocational education and training;

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Graduate professional entry courses in accounting and law

This project sets out to explore, first, whether a masters level degree that meets the requirements for entry into a profession applied different academic standards to those applied in an undergraduate degree that also meets the same professional entry requirements. The second main question was, what should the academic standards be for a professional entry masters course? The research has provided a picture of the structure, learning objectives, teaching and assessment practices for professional bachelor and masters courses in accounting and law. This project has: (1) identified academic standards relating to learning outcomes to distinguish the two pathways to professional practice - undergraduate and postgraduate; (2) benchmarked these standards and used them to develop national academic standards for masters by coursework, focussing on professional entry masters; (3) resulted in a shared standards model for use by law and accounting schools; (4) provided standards to allow students and the professions to understand the differences between the two pathways to professional practice; (5) allowed course coordinators to explain how the areas of knowledge and skills are addressed in both types of qualification and how the two courses differ in respect of the learning outcomes to be achieved by graduates; (6) assisted the accounting bodies, legal accrediting bodies, and those institutions, like the College of Law, which offer statutory authorised legal professional training to law graduates seeking to enter legal practice, to understand the applicable academic standards; (7) assisted accrediting bodies e.g. Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) in accrediting these courses; (8) assisted academics in disciplines other than accounting and law which are introducing or have already introduced graduate entry professional courses to identify and develop applicable academic standards for their courses; and (9) provided a model for other academics that may be planning similar projects to understand standards on different levels of course or to understand how to build courses for students with different entry skills gained from prior educational and life experiences.

This project sets out to explore, first, whether a masters level degree that meets the requirements for entry into a ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Jackson, Margaret; Cattlin, Joann; Lowe, Lillian;
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Students; Higher education; Qualifications;

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