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Eyes on the future: the impact of a university campus experience day on students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds

Students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds, rural areas, non-English speaking backgrounds and those who are Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, have traditionally been underrepresented in higher education in Australia. The UC 4 Yourself experience day is an outreach program by the University of Canberra for schools identified as having substantial numbers of students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds. It provides a full day of participation in, and gaining information about, university life. The current article reports on two survey studies (N = 525; N = 183) investigating the effectiveness of this program. Students who participated in the program were more likely to plan to attend university and were better able to imagine themselves as university students after their campus visit. Findings from the two studies suggest that the actual visit, despite its brevity, provides a unique experience by simultaneously establishing a knowledge base and facilitating the psychological transformation necessary to imagine a new future.

Students from financially disadvantaged backgrounds, rural areas, non-English speaking backgrounds and those who are ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Fleming, Michele J.; Grace, Diana M.
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Australian Capital Territory; Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Australian journal of education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Disadvantaged; Participation; Providers of education and training;

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The private rate of return to a university degree in Australia

This article presents estimates of the private monetary benefits in Australia associated with the completion of bachelor degrees for a range of fields of study under a range of different assumptions. For the average person, results show strong monetary incentives to complete these degrees and the private rate of return compares favourably with the real long-term bond rate. However, differences can be observed in rates of return according to gender and discipline of study with, generally, lower returns for women and for those holding degrees in the humanities. The results are calculated on varying assumptions which provide evidence of the robustness of the conclusions. Finally, implications for policy, such as university financing and increases in university places, are discussed.

This article presents estimates of the private monetary benefits in Australia associated with the completion of bachelor ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Daly, Anne; Lewis, Philip E. T.; Corliss, Michael;
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Australian journal of education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Outcomes; Higher education; Finance;

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Learning-to-be in two vocationally-oriented higher education degrees

Purpose - This paper aims to explore the pedagogical approach of two higher education programmes aiming to develop both discipline-specific and key employability skills in graduates. Design/methodology/approach - This paper presents two case studies of degree programs in the broad field of the creative industries and focusses on the innovative pedagogy adopted based on a 'learning to be' approach (McWilliam, 2008). Findings - The two case studies describe a different type of pedagogy taken up at one mixed-sector institution over two degree programs. The degrees offered within this institution are recognised as being vocationally oriented yet productive of the higher-order skills expected of degree programs. The case studies illustrate this through a pedagogy designed to orientate the students towards the development of a sense of identity whilst also placing them within the broader professional context of the discipline. Practical implications - The paper has practical implications for educators in the field and points towards the need to consider the broader professional context of the students in the course design and review phases of programmes in the creative industries. Originality/value - It is hoped the findings will be useful to educators and curriculum developers in other creative industries' higher education programs with a vocational orientation to inform future course design, review and planning.

Purpose - This paper aims to explore the pedagogical approach of two higher education programmes aiming to develop both ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Pollard, Vikki; Vincent, Andrew; Wilson, Emily
Date: 2015
Journal title: On the horizon
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Pathways; Research; Teaching and learning;

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360 degrees: equipping Scotland's graduates for success

There has been a lot of talk recently about the prospects facing young people - graduates included - as a consequence of a slow moving labour market. Although the economic recovery is still fragile, young people with the right skills and attitude can still succeed. And they are doing so, as shown in every one of the 19 graduates featured in these pages. Scotland risks doing young people a great disservice if the recession is used as an excuse to diminish the confidence of a whole generation or if generalisations are made about attitudes or abilities found wanting in young people. There are high-quality jobs out there to be had as employers from across a range of sectors testify. There are also highly skilled, highly motivated and highly sought-after graduates emerging from Scotland's universities.

There has been a lot of talk recently about the prospects facing young people - graduates included - as a consequence of a ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Association of Graduate Careers Advisory Services Scotland (AGCAS Scotland)
Universities Scotland
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Scotland; Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Students; Higher education; Outcomes;

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'What's the sign for 'catch 22'?': barriers to professional formation for deaf teachers of British Sign Language in the further education sector

In 2007, Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills standards (QTLS) were introduced for all teachers working in UK further education (FE) institutions, with the expressed aim of improving professional standards within the sector. British Sign Language (BSL) teaching is largely delivered by deaf native signers through evening classes at local FE colleges, but the majority hold no formal teaching qualifications. Therefore this initiative provided BSL teachers with an opportunity to enhance their skills and practice, but also presented a formidable barrier to achieving qualified teacher status. Two research projects undertaken by the University of Central Lancashire in 2009 and 2010 assessed the suitability of training courses designed to help FE teachers achieve these new qualifications, with particular emphasis on whether these courses meet the specific pedagogic needs of deaf learners. The shortcomings in training provision that were found illustrate the invidious position deaf learners find themselves in, on the one hand wanting to enhance their skills and qualifications whilst at the same time being effectively barred from doing so by a lack of adequate and appropriate training opportunities. This article highlights some of the experiences of deaf BSL teachers seeking to gain these awards and illustrates the ways in which the delivery of training courses fails on virtually every level to respond to the different learning requirements of sign language users.

In 2007, Qualified Teacher Learning and Skills standards (QTLS) were introduced for all teachers working in UK further ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Barnes, Lynne; Atherton, Martin
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Journal title: Journal of further and higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Teaching and learning; Higher education;

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The cultural determinants of access to post-secondary education by first generation households: an analysis using the Youth in Transition Survey

The OECD (2012) recently noted that post-secondary education (PSE) participation rates in Canada will need to continue to expand as the population ages and as the needs of the knowledge-based economy increase. With many groups already participating at high rates, much of this expansion will have to come from groups which are currently underrepresented in PSE (especially at the university level), including Aboriginals, the disabled, rural students, and students from low-income families. Children from families where neither parent has completed any level of PSE also represent an important underrepresented group - and one that broadly cuts across (and is related to) the other specific groups just mentioned. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the factors - with a focus on the 'cultural factors' - which favour PSE participation among those children who come from such families. [The] findings identify a range of effects which could hold important clues as to why some children from families without a history of PSE go on to access PSE while others do not, and thus point to how these rates could potentially be increased through policy measures. Furthermore, those measures, being focused on cultural factors rather than the financial barriers that have been concentrated on in the past (tuition fees, student aid, etc.) may in some cases not only be more effective in changing behaviour, but may do so at lower cost. Only further research can help identify which policies work, which do not, and which are most cost effective.

The OECD (2012) recently noted that post-secondary education (PSE) participation rates in Canada will need to continue to ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Childs, Stephen; Finnie, Ross; Mueller, Richard E.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Equity; Teaching and learning; Culture and society;

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Review of the Discipline of Engineering

The Review of the Discipline of Engineering was commissioned by the Tertiary Education Commission to review the current provision of professional engineering education and research in Australian engineering schools, and to report on future developments in engineering education in the light of industry and community requirements.

The Review of the Discipline of Engineering was commissioned by the Tertiary Education Commission to review the current ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Department of Employment, Education and Training (DEET)
Date: 1988
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Teaching and learning;

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Overconfidence of vocational education students when entering higher education

There is evidence that students who attend Technical and Further Education (TAFE) prior to entering higher education underperform in their first year of study. This paper examines the role of self-efficacy in understanding the performance of students who completed TAFE in the previous year in a first year subject of microeconomics in a dual sector university in Melbourne, Australia. A student's self-efficacy is positively associated with their marks in a first year subject of microeconomics. However, the relationship between final marks and self-efficacy is negative for those students who attended TAFE in the previous year suggesting that they suffer from the problem of overconfidence. When holding self-efficacy constant using econometric techniques, TAFE attendance is found to be positively related to final marks. The study utilises data collected by surveys of 151 students. The findings are exploratory (based on a small sample) and lead to a need to conduct cross institutional studies. The research points to the need for early interventions so that TAFE students perform well in their first year of higher education. It also points to potential issues in the development of Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL) programs.

There is evidence that students who attend Technical and Further Education (TAFE) prior to entering higher education ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bowden, Mark P.; Abhayawansa, Subhash; Bahtsevanoglou, John
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Victoria; Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Education + training
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Students; Vocational education and training; Higher education;

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University education in Nigeria for global competitiveness, entrepreneurship development job creation and wealth generation: which role for the guidance counsellor?

Global competitiveness demands new ways of living, communicating and interacting. In the new world order [the] international system of stratification has come to be based not on 'who owns what' but on who knows what. Nigerian universities up to the 1970s produced graduates that could compete with graduates from other countries. Today, the story is different as university graduates cannot defend their degrees nor compete internationally. Many are considered half-baked and unemployable thus leading to large scale unemployment. Entrepreneurship education is being introduced in the universities as a means of finding a solution to the unemployment problem. In this regard the guidance counsellor has a number of roles to play. This paper maintains the stance that the counsellor liaising with university authorities, various occupational organization and small scale industrialists can counsel university students about entrepreneurial options (career guidance), invite successful entrepreneurs to talk to students about their businesses, use bibliotherapeutic techniques and field trips among others to create entrepreneurial spirit in the students.

Global competitiveness demands new ways of living, communicating and interacting. In the new world order [the] international ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Akpochafo, Grace Omejevwe
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Africa; Nigeria
Journal title: Journal of education and practice
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Career development; Higher education; Providers of education and training

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An evaluation of the impact of the Social Mobility Foundation programmes on education outcomes

The UK has relatively low levels of intergenerational income mobility and there is evidence to suggest that professional occupations have become more, not less, socially exclusive over time. Recent evidence suggests that pupils educated in independent schools are more likely to access professional occupations than pupils from state schools, even conditional on prior academic attainment and gaining access to a high-status university. Improving access to professional occupations for disadvantaged young people would therefore make a positive contribution to improving social mobility in the UK. The Social Mobility Foundation (SMF) was founded in 2005 with the aim of facilitating access to 'high-status' universities and professional occupations for high attaining pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds through work experience. The SMF's current programmes feature four key elements of mentoring, internships, university application support (including trips to universities and assistance with writing their personal statement, tests and interviews) and skills development workshops. Their main programme is known as the Aspiring Professionals Programme (APP). University participation, and especially participation at a high-status institution in a relevant subject, is a potentially important intermediate step towards accessing the type of professional occupations the SMF targets. This report therefore evaluates the impact of the SMF's programmes on university participation overall and at high-status institutions. It also assesses its effect on subject choice (although this is not explicitly targeted by the SMF's programmes). The impact of the SMF's work on post-graduation education and employment choices, and in particular occupation outcomes, will be evaluated in future by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) as the required data become available.

The UK has relatively low levels of intergenerational income mobility and there is evidence to suggest that professional ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Crawford, Claire; Greaves, Ellen; Jin, Wenchao
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Report
Series name: IFS report
Subjects: Equity; Disadvantaged; Participation;

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