Search results

Advanced search   My selection

Understanding the MOOC trend: the adoption and impact of massive open online courses

This paper addresses three questions: What makes [massive open online courses] MOOCs different from previous online and open education efforts? Will MOOCs generate a positive return on investment for their providers? What can be learnt from early entrants into large-scale online instruction?

This paper addresses three questions: What makes [massive open online courses] MOOCs different from previous online and open ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Attis, David; Koproske, Colin; Miller, Chris
Date: 2012
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Higher education; Teaching and learning; Finance;

VITAL Object

Education indicators in Canada: an international perspective 2014

This sixth annual report in the series covers certain aspects of the educational systems in Canada's provinces and territories and places them in an international context. The indicators presented here align with the definitions and methodologies used by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). This set of internationally comparable indicators offers statistical information for the following key themes: Chapter A, The output of educational institutions and the impact of learning, profiles educational attainment among the adult population. It also presents information on graduation and completion rates at the upper secondary level, and on relationships between educational attainment and labour market outcomes. Chapter B, Financial resources invested in education, focuses on spending on education. This information is presented both in terms of expenditure per student and expenditure in relation to the overall amount of resources as measured by gross domestic product (GDP). The proportions of current and capital expenditures are also outlined. Chapter C, Access to education, participation and progression, explores the extent of international student enrolment in college and university programs in Canada and its provinces and territories, and how this has changed over time. Several aspects of the transition from education to the labour force are examined, including the extent to which young adults are neither employed nor in education. Chapter D, The learning environment and organization of schools, reports on the amount of time students must, in principle, spend in class as established by public regulations. It also presents information on key aspects of working environments for elementary and secondary school teachers: teaching time (as determined by policy) in the context of total working time, and salary. Chapter E, Skills proficiencies of adults, is an addition for 2014. The Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC) assessed the literacy, numeracy and problem solving skills of adults aged 16 to 65. This chapter outlines a selection of results from PIAAC that also draws on respondents' answers to questions about their education and employment status, as well as various social outcomes such as good health, volunteering, trust in others and trust in government.

This sixth annual report in the series covers certain aspects of the educational systems in Canada's provinces and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Statistics Canada. Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics Division
Council of Ministers of Education (Canada) (CMEC)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: North America; Canada
Resource type: Statistical resource
Subjects: Statistics; Participation; Outcomes;

VITAL Object

What makes them leave and where do they go?: non-completion and institutional departures in STEM

This chapter presents the results of a quantitative analysis of national data covering Danish students who in the period 1995-2009 completed an upper-secondary school programme and entered a higher-education science, technology, engineering or mathematics (STEM) programme. The analysis focuses on identifying variables that change the hazard ratio for (1) entering a STEM programme and (2) leaving a STEM programme without completing it. Finally, the chapter explores (3) the destinations of students who leave a STEM higher-education programme. It is found that there has been no change in the relative chance of a male or female student entering a STEM programme. The results suggest that female students are more affected by achieving a high grade-point average [GPA] and by the educational background of their parents than are the male students. The relative risk of non-completion is higher for women than for men, but the most important factor is GPA on entry. A disturbing result is that when students leave a STEM programme, only one third enter another STEM programme. Slightly more enter a non-STEM programme while non-STEM leavers only rarely enter a STEM programme. Non-completion in STEM higher education is a net loss of STEM graduates.

This chapter presents the results of a quantitative analysis of national data covering Danish students who in the period ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ulriksen, Lars; Madsen, Lene Moller; Holmegaard, Henriette Tolstrup
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Denmark; Europe
Resource type: Book chapter
Subjects: Students; Higher education; Gender;

VITAL Object

Higher education in Scandinavia

Universities have been challenged on how to cope with various external pressures, such as forces of globalization and international markets, increased national and international competition for students and research grants, increased pressure to become more efficient economically and regarding students' length of studies. These various pressures can be seen as expressions of national policy changes from more democratic governance towards new public management principles. In this chapter, [the authors] will examine how higher education systems in Scandinavia [defined here as the three North European countries of Norway, Denmark, and Sweden] are developing in relation to these challenges. To what extent has the democratic tradition had an impact on the educational systems, and what possible futures can be envisioned?

Universities have been challenged on how to cope with various external pressures, such as forces of globalization and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Nielsen, Jorgen Lerche; Andreasen, Lars Birch
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Denmark; Norway; Sweden;
Resource type: Book chapter
Subjects: Higher education; Governance; Providers of education and training;

VITAL Object

Needs-based mentoring: a dynamic approach to engaging students from refugee backgrounds

Of students from language background other than English (LBOTE), those who have come to Australia as refugees face many barriers in accessing higher education and catering to the needs of these students is necessarily complex. Students from refugee backgrounds face cumulative deprivation of relevant cultural capital (including assumed knowledge about further education such as [Higher Education Contribution Scheme-Higher Education Loan Programme] HECS-HELP, [Australian Tertiary Admission Rank] ATAR and higher education pathways) inhibiting meaningful access to further education opportunities. The Macquarie Mentoring program supports high school students from refugee backgrounds through a holistic and flexible step-by-step approach to mentoring, allowing the students to set the speed and direction of the mentoring process, and to take ownership of their engagement in higher education. Macquarie mentors, often from similar backgrounds to the students, serve as positive role models and seek to foster students' confidence in their own capacities and high aspirations whilst encouraging them to think laterally about the opportunities available to them. This paper will discuss the benefits and success of the Macquarie Mentoring program as a flexible platform with which to engage high school students from refugee backgrounds in higher education.

Of students from language background other than English (LBOTE), those who have come to Australia as refugees face many ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ephraums, Robert; Khan, Hina
Conference name: National Association of Enabling Educators of Australia Conference
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: New South Wales; Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Higher education; Migration; Equity;

VITAL Object

Parental expectations relating to children's higher education in urban China: cultural capital and social class

This article employs Bourdieu's concept of cultural capital to examine the social class differences in the expectations relating to higher education among parents and students in urban China. This study fills a gap in understanding the complex factors that underpin parental expectations regarding children's higher education. This study has been conducted using mixed methods, comprising a large-scale questionnaire with semi-structured interviews. The data have revealed that parental expectations of their children's higher education are classed. There is a significant difference between middle-class and working-class parental expectations regarding children's higher education due to difference in the volumes of cultural capital. It is clear that some of the middle-class parents have a particular concern as to whether the campus culture matches their children's personality.

This article employs Bourdieu's concept of cultural capital to examine the social class differences in the expectations ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Sheng, Xiaoming
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: China; Asia
Journal title: Journal of sociology
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Students; Culture and society;

VITAL Object

Skill mastery and the formation of graduate identity in bachelor graduates: evidence from Australia

Mastery of certain generic skills and the successful formation of pre-professional identity are widely considered to influence graduate work-readiness and job attainment. Given their links with enhanced productivity, performance and innovation, skill development and graduate identity appear critical amidst ongoing global stagnation in advanced economies. This paper focuses on the success of higher education in developing generic skills and graduate identity using national data (n = 80,891) for 51 providers. It investigates the influence of certain demographics, study and degree characteristics on these important areas of undergraduate curricula. Furthermore, it gauges recent graduate perceptions on the importance of skill development to post-graduation employment and how these beliefs vary across different employment contexts. Implications for how education practitioners can produce graduates with the skills, self-belief, outlook and confidence to attain a graduate-level job are discussed.

Mastery of certain generic skills and the successful formation of pre-professional identity are widely considered to ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Jackson, Denise
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Studies in higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Students; Higher education;

VITAL Object

Reinterpreting higher education quality in response to policies of mass education: the Australian experience

This article explores the relationship between mass education, higher education quality and policy development in Australia in the period 2008-2014, during which access to higher education was significantly increased. Over this time, which included a change of national government, the discursive relationship between mass higher education and higher education quality shifted from conceptualising quality as a function of economic productivity, through educational transformation and academic standards, to market competition and efficiency. Throughout, the student was more often positioned as a servant towards higher education quality, rather than its benefactor.

This article explores the relationship between mass education, higher education quality and policy development in Australia ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Pitman, Tim
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Quality in higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Quality; Policy;

VITAL Object

Affirmative action through quotas: the effect on learning in India

Countries characterized by significant learning inequalities across racial and ethnic groups frequently address them through a quota system in higher education. Using data from India, this paper estimates the effect of quotas on learning, quantifying their cost by comparing outcomes to those obtained under alternative admission rules. It does so by assessing how learning is affected by the mean and variance of classroom ability. [The author] uses control functions to eliminate selection bias, identifying them through a novel strategy which exploits the fact that students choose programs based on the partial information available at enrollment, information that determines enrollment but not learning conditional on enrollment.

Countries characterized by significant learning inequalities across racial and ethnic groups frequently address them through ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Kochar, Anjini
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: India; Asia
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: SCID working paper
Subjects: Higher education; Equity; Demographics;

VITAL Object

Learning to make a difference: student-community engagement and the higher education curriculum

This guide presents current thinking and innovations in development and professional practice in student-community engagement (SCE), defined here as students being involved in community projects local to their university. This would usually involve the inclusion within the higher education curriculum of a period of time during which students work for a community-based organisation in ways that enable them to benefit the community and learn from their experience. Developing students' understanding of questions of equality and social justice, and a sense of social responsibility, is an outcome central to SCE programs and the authors have written this book as a response to this. The first section looks at the history of the university and the place of engagement or social responsibility in it. The second section provides some practical support in designing and developing SCE within a university setting, showing how learning from community engagement can enrich a university education. Section three provides some case studies written by students or community partners associated with the Community University Partnership Programme (CUPP) at the University of Brighton.

This guide presents current thinking and innovations in development and professional practice in student-community ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Millican, Juliet; Bourner, Tom
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Book
Subjects: Students; Higher education; Teaching and learning;

VITAL Object