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Early workplace learning experiences: what are the pedagogical possibilities beyond retention and employability?

With this paper, [the authors] explore early placement experiences and their pedagogical potential, including ways of keeping students enrolled and persisting with their studies. Few university courses offer early placements because traditionally placement experiences have a focus on employability and work readiness of graduates, hence occur towards the end of courses. [The authors] conceptualise workplace learning (WPL) as a transition pedagogy that can address university staff's interests in student retention. In this paper the relationship between early WPL experiences and keeping students enrolled and persisting with their learning as well as the pedagogical implications of early WPL experiences are explored. Empirical data of students' interpretations of their early placement experiences demonstrated that beyond motivating students to persist with learning and staying enrolled in the course placement experiences were seen as a highlight of their first year studies. [The authors] argue that there are some benefits to students' learning to using early placement experiences within a practice-based curriculum when combined with an explicit and deliberate pedagogy that prepares students for practice-based and lifelong learning approaches to work. [The authors] conclude that early WPL experiences at university can be used as a strategy to assist students to transition into these institutions and develop more deliberate learner and professional identities.

With this paper, [the authors] explore early placement experiences and their pedagogical potential, including ways of ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Trede, Franziska; McEwen, Celina
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Students; Workforce development; Participation;

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Returning to learning: what are the academic development needs of mature and part-time students?: what works to support and retain these students?

This paper considers the support and retention of mature and part-time (MaP) students. It analyses the specific academic development needs of MaP students based on Wenger's model of learning (1998) which puts the academic learning needs of students into three broad categories; the first is academic confidence and learner identity, the second is the need for MaP students to integrate and build a sense of community, and the third is for these students to overcome anxiety through practice and practical considerations. Then an appreciative inquiry (Cooperrider et al., 2008) approach is used to develop the University of Kent's Student Learning Advisory Service (SLAS) MaP programme called VALUE MaP. The programme offers; self-assessment of needs, one to one advice and targeted study skills sessions. The conclusion points to the positive responses received from MaP students about the programme but also acknowledges that more could be done; perhaps through reflection on students' prior knowledge, a stronger emphasis on building social learning networks, and the increased use of technology.

This paper considers the support and retention of mature and part-time (MaP) students. It analyses the specific academic ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Frith, Louise; Wilson, Allia
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: England; Great Britain; Europe
Journal title: Journal of learning development in higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Students; Higher education; Participation;

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Making performance accountability work: English lessons for US community colleges

In the United States, efforts to use performance accountability as a way to drive improvement in public higher education institutions and systems have yielded mixed results. A more encouraging story has unfolded in England. There, a nationwide accountability system for further education colleges - England's community-college counterparts - has led to impressive increases in student outcomes since it was implemented in 1992. Students from disadvantaged backgrounds have made particularly large gains. [This report] takes a detailed look at the policy innovations in England. For US policymakers, they provide both reason for caution and guidance for designing and implementing better performance measurement and funding systems.

In the United States, efforts to use performance accountability as a way to drive improvement in public higher education ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Jaquette, Ozan
Date: 2006
Geographic subjects: Europe; Great Britain; England;
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Performance; Outcomes;

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Entrepreneurial intentions of students at further education and training colleges in South Africa

The relevance of entrepreneurship is underscored in the public policy domain where a wide range of government policies support the development of entrepreneurship, with further education and training (FET) colleges seen as critical role-players. Research has shown that entrepreneurship education increases students' self-confidence and overall attitudes, which in turn increases their perceptions of feasibility and desirability of pursuing entrepreneurship as a career. Recognising that the challenge for FET colleges is to ensure that graduates are also equipped for self-employment, this study investigated the entrepreneurial intentions (EIs) of final year FET college students in four provinces. Statistical analysis revealed high levels of EIs amongst differing groups irrespective of personal (gender) or contextual attributes (in urban vs. rural vs. metro-township FET colleges). Implications can be advanced to the policy domain where it needs to be stressed that government initiatives will affect entrepreneurship development only if these policies are perceived in a way that influences individuals' EIs, in particular their conviction, as characterised by general attitudes towards entrepreneurship.

The relevance of entrepreneurship is underscored in the public policy domain where a wide range of government policies ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Skosana, B. V.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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Lifelong learning, higher education and the development of learning communities

This set of recent papers reflects the work of the author and compiles concepts and ideas, policies and tensions associated with adult education and lifelong learning, and the role of higher education in contemporary societies. The publication is aimed at two audiences in particular, the first being Hungary and the other being the rest of Europe. The papers are as follows: Global-local, economic-civic: trends in HE and LLL from a Hungarian perspective [preface by Chris Duke]; The perspectives of adult education for countries in Central-Eastern Europe: historical and political dimensions and patterns; Lifelong learning, social movements and policy, fighting back poverty and social exclusion; In the building of an active citizen: the crossing of aims of liberal politics and of urban adult education movements at the turn of the 19th and 20th century Hungary: a tribute to Franz Poggeler; Learning cities, regions and learning communities: some characteristics of the development of the Pecs Learning City-Region Forum and the messages of the Pure Project; New forms of mobility in higher education: developments in the European Masters of Adult Education (EMAE) and the innovation potential of Eurolocal and R3L+ projects; Making higher education to open up to adult learners: an actual issue for quality education: CONFINTEA VI follow up and role of university lifelong learning: some issues for European higher education; Is there a chance for roles of higher education in the development of a 'learning climate' through regional development in Hungary?; Country report on the action plan on adult learning: Hungary; Country report on the action plan on adult learning: Romania.

This set of recent papers reflects the work of the author and compiles concepts and ideas, policies and tensions associated ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Nemeth, Balazs
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe; Romania; Hungary
Resource type: Book
Subjects: Lifelong learning; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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Employability deconstructed: perceptions of Bologna stakeholders

The paper analyses employability as a floating signifier - a construct that accommodates different and often contending meanings. A preliminary analysis of scholarly literature identifies two opposing interpretations of employability: an individual responsibility versus a comprehensive context-aware construct. These are subsequently applied to the discourse of the major interests in the Bologna Process: policy-makers; institutions and academics; students; and employers. Their standpoints are examined from two dimensions: how far is responsibility for employability individualised?; and what is higher education's role in fostering employability? As a concept, employability commands little consensus. Rather, it is interpreted in the light of each interest group's concerns. As to higher education's role, utilitarianism characterises all but academic actors' views. Applying the concept of a floating signifier to employability as it is debated within the Bologna Process - a policy arena for competing interest groups to dispute meaning - reveals a finer, more nuanced understanding of how policy comes to be and, in particular, the importance of discourse and conflicts over meaning as factors intrinsic to it.

The paper analyses employability as a floating signifier - a construct that accommodates different and often contending ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Sin, Cristina; Neave, Guy
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe
Journal title: Studies in higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Policy; Higher education;

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Post-secondary qualifications and training for Indigenous Australians

This paper focuses on the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey (NATSIS) results about the educational status of Indigenous Australians and makes some comparisons with the Census of Population and Housing where applicable. There are a number of questions which policy makers might be interested in answering with the NATSIS data. The first group of questions relates to the extent of education and training received by Indigenous Australians, that is, a description of the broad facts. A second group of questions relates more to particular policies in this area.

This paper focuses on the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey (NATSIS) results about the educational ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Daly, Anne
Conference name: Statistical Needs for Effective Indigenous Policy: Findings from the 1994 National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Survey
Date: 1996
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Conference
Series name: Research monograph (Australian National University. Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research)
Subjects: Indigenous people; Participation; Qualifications;

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International comparisons in further education

This report compares selected issues of further education (FE) in England with other comparable FE systems in Finland, Ireland, Sweden and New South Wales, Australia. The method involved a review of the literature and analytical reports for each country followed by expert consultations in each country. This research emphasises the complex nature of post-compulsory provision in the four country contexts, and highlights the acute necessity for 'joined-up' policy thinking that crosses different policy domains, carefully designed and prepared reforms, and 'creeping rather than jumping' reform. The evidence suggests that excessive reform of one particular feature of a system (such as qualifications) will not provide the stability and coherence that post-compulsory [vocational education and training] VET systems need in order to be able to attract learners to that provision and employers to learners who successfully complete that provision.

This report compares selected issues of further education (FE) in England with other comparable FE systems in Finland, ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Leney, Tom; May, Tom; Hayward, Geoff;
Date: 2007
Geographic subjects: Europe; Great Britain; England;
Resource type: Report
Series name: DfES research report
Subjects: Higher education; Vocational education and training; Research;

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No time to waste: policy recommendations for increasing college completion

Substantially increasing the numbers of students who complete career certificates and two- and four-year college degrees has not been a major state, regional or national priority, and the American system of higher education has tolerated low degree-completion rates for too long [in the authors' opinion]. Improving college completion is more important than ever, as a majority of American high school graduates now seek postsecondary education. The immediate major challenge for the nation and every state is to ensure their populations have the levels of education necessary to meet the job requirements of the next 15 years.

Substantially increasing the numbers of students who complete career certificates and two- and four-year college degrees has ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Spence, Dave; Blanco, Cheryl; Root, Megan;
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Policy; Participation; Higher education;

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Professional bodies and quality assurance of higher education programmes in South Africa: towards an appropriate framework

Collaboration between universities and professional bodies is neither new nor unique to South Africa. It occurs in many higher education systems and revolves around the role that professional bodies play in the quality assurance and accreditation of the relevant higher education programmes. In South Africa, this relationship has become increasingly problematic over the recent past due to a number of factors. This article begins by exploring those factors before highlighting the legal framework governing the role of professional bodies in higher education programmes. A critique of the said role is then undertaken against the backdrop of views and opinions from academics involved in professional programmes at some South African universities, including the thorny issue of who should meet the costs of accreditation. The article concludes with suggestions on the principles that should underpin a revised framework, under the custodianship of the Council for Higher Education (CHE), to govern the relationship between universities and professional bodies.

Collaboration between universities and professional bodies is neither new nor unique to South Africa. It occurs in many ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ballim, Y.; Mabizela, S.; Mubangizi, J. C.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Governance;

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