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Completion of educational doctorates: how universities can foster persistence

With high attrition and long time-to-degree completion rates in education doctorate programs, it is important to identify ways for program administrators and faculty to foster student persistence. The purpose of this qualitative, phenomenological inquiry was to examine the beliefs, attitudes, and experiences of individuals who successfully completed doctoral degrees in the field of education in order to identify ways in which academic institutions can encourage persistence. Glasser's (1998) choice theory and Tinto's (1975) student integration model were utilized as a framework for the study. From participant narratives of their education doctoral program experiences, five primary themes of doctoral program completion were identified. The themes were the following: (a) relationships with family, faculty and peers; (b) determination, organization skills, and time management; (c) program flexibility and course relevance; (d) career advancement and financial reward; and (e) clear doctoral program expectations. Derived from these themes, recommendations are provided for program administrators and faculty to foster student persistence in their doctorate of education programs.

With high attrition and long time-to-degree completion rates in education doctorate programs, it is important to identify ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Rockinson-Szapkiw, Amanda J.; Spaulding, Lucinda S.; Bade, Bob
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Journal title: International journal of doctoral studies
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Participation; Qualifications; Teaching and learning;

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Importance of soft skills for industrial training program: employers' perspective

Industrial training is considered to be an effective tool to enhance graduates' employability. This paper attempts to highlight four key soft skills that have been identified by the Ministry of Higher Education (MOHE), Malaysia, in its move to enhance employability among students from three faculties. A questionnaire based on the basic employability skills was used to collect data. The study reveals a satisfactory level of students' performance during the training. Teamwork skill and critical thinking were ranked as needing the most improvement by students. In conclusion, the findings illustrate that the employers agreed that industrial training program is one of the vital contributors to the employability skills. As an implication, universities need to equip students not just with intellectual capabilities but also applied practical soft skills which make them more 'work ready'.

Industrial training is considered to be an effective tool to enhance graduates' employability. This paper attempts to ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Khalid, Nurkaliza; Hamid, Nor 'Adha Abd; Sailin, Rahmatunnisah;
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Malaysia; Asia
Journal title: Asian journal of social sciences and humanities
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Employment; Industry;

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Making real the dream of Education for All through open schooling and open universities in Ghana

Although the last three decades have witnessed astronomical increases in enrollment in basic education, the challenges of access, equity, and quality continue to confront countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In Ghana, education sector policies and reforms have been unable to deal with low transition rates from primary to junior high schools, from junior high schools to senior high schools, and from senior high schools to tertiary level. Children and young students who are unable to continue fail to re-enter because of the absence of complementary or alternative pathways. The old paradigm of physical expansion continues to dominate policies of access. Although several developed and developing countries have used open schooling and open universities to widen access, the success of these programs has been founded on strong policies, commitment of government, and huge investment in technology. Indeed, the future lies with open schooling and open universities.

Although the last three decades have witnessed astronomical increases in enrollment in basic education, the challenges of ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Tagoe, Michael
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Africa; Ghana
Journal title: SAGE open
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Participation; Outcomes; Pathways;

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Youth transitions in Australia: a moving picture

The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program provides information on the key transition points in young people's lives up to the age of 25. This publication highlights the key elements from the LSAY annual report 2013. Using LSAY data and research findings, it demonstrates how transitions for young Australians continue to change. It covers a broad range of topics, including student aspirations, the importance of schools, increasing educational participation, and the challenges faced by young people as they begin their working lives. Changes in living arrangements, marriage and satisfaction with life are also explored.

The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program provides information on the key transition points in young ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Statistical resource
Subjects: Youth; Outcomes; Statistics;

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Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth annual report 2013

The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program is an important evidence base for youth policy, providing information on the key transition points in young people's lives up to the age of 25 years. The first edition of this annual report provides an overview of the LSAY program and presents information about young people, using the latest LSAY data. Key transition points and changes across the LSAY cohorts, as well as differences among the subgroups of interest (for example, gender, location and socioeconomic status) are explored. A special chapter is reserved for investigating the important topic of the effect that schools have on student outcomes. The report also includes a summary of LSAY research published in 2013-14, and examines the impact that LSAY research has had in terms of citations and media attention.

The Longitudinal Surveys of Australian Youth (LSAY) program is an important evidence base for youth policy, providing ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Statistical resource
Subjects: Youth; Outcomes; Statistics;

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Skills: where are we today?: the state of skills and PSE in Canada

Canada requires a high-performing post-secondary education (PSE) sector to produce people with the advanced skills and knowledge necessary to contribute to economic, social, political and individual well-being. Although Canada's PSE sector has performed relatively well to date on many measures, it can do much better. More attention needs to be focused on the quality of skills being produced to meet and address current and future economic and social opportunities and challenges. This report provides a systems perspective on the state of skills and higher education in Canada and identifies areas where the sector could improve in producing highly skilled graduates.

Canada requires a high-performing post-secondary education (PSE) sector to produce people with the advanced skills and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Munro, Daniel; MacLaine, Cameron; Stuckey, James
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Teaching and learning; Higher education;

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The Affordable College Compact: a federal-state partnership to increase state investment and return to debt-free public higher education

As a postsecondary degree has become more important than ever in the labor market, and the primary means by which one enters the middle class, the US has simultaneously made it more difficult and more expensive to attain. Over the course of three decades, the cost of public colleges and universities - which educated nearly three in four students - has risen dramatically. The obvious result of increased cost during a period of stagnant incomes for low-income and middle-class families has been an increased reliance on debt as a way to finance a college education. Just 25 years ago, if a student wanted to attain a bachelor's degree, it was more likely than not that he or she would be able to do so without borrowing. Now, borrowing is nearly required to graduate with a four-year degree, particularly for low- and middle-income students.

As a postsecondary degree has become more important than ever in the labor market, and the primary means by which one enters ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Huelsman, Mark
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: North America; United States
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Finance; Students;

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State of education in NSW: inaugural biennial report: 2014

This report brings together data, information and commentary about the full spectrum of education in New South Wales. It reports on activities and outcomes in early childhood education, school education, vocational education and training (VET) and higher education. It acknowledges and reports on the complex mix of government and non-government educational service providers in all four of these sectors. There have been large increases in participation and course completions in the VET sector over the last 10 years. The increase in qualification at the Australian Qualifications Framework (AQF) diploma level and above has been particularly pronounced (increasing from 16,022 completions in 2009 to 25,683 in 2011). While increases in completions have been observed among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and people living in regional areas, these equity groups are still over-represented among lower level VET qualifications. It is also concerning that approximately one in four young people were not engaged in work or study in 2013.

This report brings together data, information and commentary about the full spectrum of education in New South Wales. It ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: New South Wales. Department of Education and Communities. Office of Education. Centre for Education Statistics and Evaluation (CESE)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia; New South Wales
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Primary education; Secondary education;

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Does scored VET in schools help or hinder access to higher education in Victoria?

The introduction of vocational education and training (VET) subjects in the secondary school curriculum in the 1990s was aimed at assisting to retain less academically inclined students at school and providing students with a broad range of post-secondary options and pathways. In the 2000s, 'scored' VET subjects - those that counted towards both nationally recognised training and a university entrance score - were introduced as a means of improving the status of VET within the secondary school curriculum as well as offering viable options to those students not entirely certain of which pathway to take - university or vocational training. Focusing on Victorian secondary school students, this report looks at whether taking scored VET subjects affects entry to university. The major finding of this report is that for those students who intend to go to university and who complete a 'scored' VET subject there is a sizeable penalty.

The introduction of vocational education and training (VET) subjects in the secondary school curriculum in the 1990s was ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Polidano, Cain; Tabasso, Domenico; Zhang, Rong
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia; Victoria
Resource type: Report
Series name: National Vocational Education and Training Research Program research report
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Higher education; Secondary education;

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Salaries and salary scales of full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities, 2010/2011: final report

This report details the salaries and salary scales of full-time teaching staff at 68 Canadian universities and colleges. Highlights of the report include: in 2010/2011, there were 44,934 full-time teaching staff at Canadian degree granting institutions, 14,946 (33.3 per cent) were full professors, 15,473 (34.4 per cent) were associate professors, 10,161 (22.6 per cent) were assistant professors, and 4,354 (9.7 per cent) were unranked; among institutions reporting in both years, the number of full teaching staff at Canadian degree granting institutions increased by 0.8 per cent from 2009/2010 to 2010/2011; between 2009/2010 and 2010/2011, the number of full professors increased by 1.5 per cent, associate professors increased by 3.3 per cent and 'rank below assistant' increased by 2.5 per cent, the number of assistant professors decreased by 4.2 per cent and the number in the 'other' category by 1.4 per cent; in 2010/2011, women accounted for over a third of full-time teaching staff, compared to just over 10 per cent in 1970/1971; the average salary of full-time faculty at Canadian degree granting institutions in 2010/2011 was $115,513, 2.8 per cent higher than the year before; full-time teaching staff at Canadian universities are getting older, in 2010/2011, the median age was 50 years as compared to 37 years in 1970/1971.

This report details the salaries and salary scales of full-time teaching staff at 68 Canadian universities and colleges. ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Statistics Canada
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Resource type: Report
Series name: Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics research paper
Subjects: Statistics; Providers of education and training; Research;

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