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Professional bodies and quality assurance of higher education programmes in South Africa: towards an appropriate framework

Collaboration between universities and professional bodies is neither new nor unique to South Africa. It occurs in many higher education systems and revolves around the role that professional bodies play in the quality assurance and accreditation of the relevant higher education programmes. In South Africa, this relationship has become increasingly problematic over the recent past due to a number of factors. This article begins by exploring those factors before highlighting the legal framework governing the role of professional bodies in higher education programmes. A critique of the said role is then undertaken against the backdrop of views and opinions from academics involved in professional programmes at some South African universities, including the thorny issue of who should meet the costs of accreditation. The article concludes with suggestions on the principles that should underpin a revised framework, under the custodianship of the Council for Higher Education (CHE), to govern the relationship between universities and professional bodies.

Collaboration between universities and professional bodies is neither new nor unique to South Africa. It occurs in many ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ballim, Y.; Mabizela, S.; Mubangizi, J. C.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Governance;

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Promoting a culture of student success: how colleges and universities are improving degree completion

Despite rising college enrollment, improvement in students' timely completion of bachelor's degrees in the United States has stalled. Student success rates are alarmingly low and have not changed significantly in many years: fewer than one-third of degree-seeking, full-time freshmen in public four-year institutions graduate in four years. Most students who enter college as first-time, full-time freshmen take at least six years to earn a bachelor's degree - and only 55 per cent graduate in that time span. Clearly, the nation's success in attracting more students to college has not been matched by success in graduating them. In fact, research shows that students from disadvantaged economic backgrounds or with low SAT/ACT scores are even less likely to complete bachelor's degrees than their classmates. Some colleges and universities, however, are helping more students complete degrees while also providing a high-quality education. These institutions often serve a comparatively high percentage of students from low-income families and students with average-or-below scores on standardized achievement tests. Yet their six-year graduation rates are near the national average for all students. These colleges and universities are the focus of this report.

Despite rising college enrollment, improvement in students' timely completion of bachelor's degrees in the United States has ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bradley, A. Paul; Blanco, Cheryl; Richard, Alan
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Participation; Outcomes; Providers of education and training;

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Changing configurations of adult education in transitional times: conference proceedings

This volume contains papers presented at the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) 2013 conference held at Humboldt University in Berlin.

This volume contains papers presented at the European Society for Research on the Education of Adults (ESREA) 2013 ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Kapplinger, Bernd; Lichte, Nina; Haberzeth, Erik;
Conference name: European Research Conference
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Europe; Great Britain; Spain;
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Adult and community education; Students; Higher education;

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Mature age students' successful transition into higher education: factors and interdependencies

A complex set of relational factors shape adult students' transition to higher education. Through accounts provided by adult vocational education students, a set of related interdependencies between what the university and other forms of support (e.g. family, friends) afforded these students and their agency, capacities and engagement were identified as shaping their transition to higher education. Bases for these students' engagement in their studies were found in their intentions and previous experiences that together shaped how they construed what is afforded by the university and other sources of support. Consequently, beyond what universities provide to support these transitions, considerations for promoting successful student transition into higher education necessarily require accounting for students' experiences, access to different kinds of support outside the university and their previous experiences. Therefore, rather than proposing general prescriptions about what universities need to do to promote successful transitions, [these] complex factors likely [play] out in quite person-particular ways. All of this reinforces the view that successful transitions to higher education are quite individual processes, and not just wholly dependent upon what educational institutions provide, and those affordances need to be [informed] by and aligned with different kinds of student needs.

A complex set of relational factors shape adult students' transition to higher education. Through accounts provided by adult ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Billett, Stephen; Searle, Jean
Date: 2013
Resource type: Book chapter
Series name: Research in vocational education
Subjects: Higher education; Students; Participation;

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Career success for women academics in higher education: choices and challenges

The aim of the research reported on in this article was to contribute to an understanding of how women academics experience career success; how their choices and challenges impact on their career development; and how the playing fields in academia can be levelled. Understanding the constraints and identifying enabling aspects may help women academics to overcome obstacles in their career development and be more represented in academia and ultimately in society. This research was a case study undertaken at one higher education institution (HEI), Rhodes University (RU). The data was collected from institutional documents; questionnaire data from women academics at the HEI; and in-depth interviews with six women academics. The data indicate that mentoring is a strategy to enhance levels of self-esteem and research productivity and ultimately improve the representation of women in leadership and senior positions.

The aim of the research reported on in this article was to contribute to an understanding of how women academics experience ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Obers, N.
Conference name: Higher Education Learning and Teaching Association of Southern Africa Conference
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Journal title: South African journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Career development; Providers of education and training; Gender;

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New horizons for vocational lecturers: spreading the responsibility for transition

The transition of students into tertiary study at Unitec [Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand] has often been seen as the responsibility of learning centres and student services, the domain of ex-language teachers and concerned counselors, covered by social activities in orientation week and unmentioned for the remainder of the semester. This nuts and bolts session describes an initiative to move transition into content areas by widening the horizons of vocational lecturers' view of what transition involves and indeed of what their discipline encompasses. It introduces a framework summarizing some of the 'first year experience' literature and discusses the implications it has for lecturers. The framework is four words - 'from, with, of, to' - which cover the transition into tertiary study and on to graduation. The framework is designed to be used by academic advisors with vocational lecturers at an Institute of Technology. It aims to spread responsibility for transition from support services onto the agendas of departments, programmes and teachers. It requires teachers to expand their horizons of tertiary education and transition.

The transition of students into tertiary study at Unitec [Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand] has often been ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Smith, Mark
Conference name: International First Year in Higher Education Conference
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Oceania
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Pathways; Providers of education and training; Vocational education and training;

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Promoting regional education services integration: APEC University Associations Cross-Border Education Cooperation Workshop, workshop report, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 20-22 May 2014

The workshop brought together representatives from university associations, universities and governments to support, pursue and work towards the achievement of the priorities outlined by [Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation] APEC Economic Leaders. The workshop focused on four key themes within cross-border education cooperation - student mobility, researcher mobility, provider mobility and virtual mobility. For each theme, presenters used their expertise in the subject matter to raise key challenges, highlight examples of good practice and consider opportunities for university associations to work together. A panel discussion on each theme enabled a broad range of experiences and perspectives to be shared. For each theme workshop delegates focused on the identification of barriers to cross-border education cooperation, good practice in cross-border education cooperation and opportunities for collaboration in cross-border education cooperation.

The workshop brought together representatives from university associations, universities and governments to support, pursue ...  Show Full Abstract  

Conference name: APEC University Associations Cross-Border Education Cooperation Workshop
Corporate authors: Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER)
Date: 2014
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: International education; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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Connected understanding: internationalization of adult education in Canada and beyond

Fueled by globalization, the internationalization of adult and higher education in Canada is happening at a rapid pace. The number of international students in Canadian higher education was 70,000 full-time and 13,000 part-time in 2006. Yet, despite its increased use in describing the international dimension of education, there has been a great deal of confusion about what 'internationalization' means. The term can mean many different things to different people. For some, it means a series of international activities (e.g. academic mobility of students and faculty), international linkages and partnerships, and new international academic programs and research initiatives, while for others it means the delivery of education to other countries through satellite programs. The Canadian Association for the Study of Adult Education (CASAE) Opening Panel explored the internationalization of adult education in Canada and beyond. The panelists examined a number of issues, including: What does internationalization mean to adult educators? What is the purpose of internationalization? Is it to prepare graduates to critically understand global issues and their local effects on individuals and communities? Or, is it to prepare graduates for a global market place? To what extent is adult education in Canada and elsewhere moving towards the internationalization of research, programs, and practice? What are the emerging trends and challenges?

Fueled by globalization, the internationalization of adult and higher education in Canada is happening at a rapid pace. The ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Guo, Shibao; Schugurensky, Daniel; Hall, Budd;
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: North America; Canada; United States
Journal title: Canadian journal for the study of adult education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Providers of education and training; International education; Higher education;

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Briefing for the incoming government

This briefing serves two purposes. First, it provides the incoming government and the Ministers responsible for tertiary education and related portfolios with a status report on New Zealand's universities. Second, it sets out the universities' contribution to New Zealand's economic, social and cultural development and seeks a commitment from the incoming government to a programme of support that will enable the universities to unlock the full potential of their contribution. The briefing concludes by setting an agenda for the government and the universities to work together to address these issues.

This briefing serves two purposes. First, it provides the incoming government and the Ministers responsible for tertiary ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: New Zealand Vice-Chancellors' Committee (NZVCC)
Date: 2008
Geographic subjects: Oceania; New Zealand
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Governance;

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Understanding successful sandwich placements: a Bourdieusian approach

Sandwich placements and other integrated work and study schemes are increasingly advocated as a key means by which universities can promote students' employability. However, there is little understanding of how successful placements work in terms of facilitating learning and development. Drawing on three longitudinal case studies of students who have undertaken placements, two successfully, [the authors] use Bourdieu's conceptions of habitus and field to theorise successful placements. [The authors] establish the importance of the initial 'fit' between an individual's habitus and the field they enter to undertake a sandwich placement, together with the extent of the 'horizon for learning' emerging through the continuing interaction of habitus and field. Further, [the authors] argue that this relational approach can help to recognise the importance of non-cognitive aspects of informal learning through placements and to understand how successful placements can be the catalyst for better grades on return to university study.

Sandwich placements and other integrated work and study schemes are increasingly advocated as a key means by which ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Clark, Martyn; Zukas, Miriam
Date: 2014
Journal title: Studies in higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Teaching and learning; Students;

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