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Peer mentoring during the transition to university: assessing the usage of a formal scheme within the UK

Although mentoring has become increasingly popular within [United Kingdom] UK higher education, there is little evaluative research. The current longitudinal study aimed to evaluate the usage of a peer mentoring scheme during a first semester at university amongst 124 students. Results indicate that during the first week at university the majority accessed the scheme but this then diminished by 10 weeks. There were strong positive correlations among contact, satisfaction and perceived mentor social support. Additionally, expectations of mentoring mediated the relationship between contact time and satisfaction. Correlations with student well-being and intention to withdraw, however, indicated that students reporting high levels of mentor support were worse off than those reporting less support. Students wanting more support from mentors were significantly lower on levels of integration and well-being. Findings suggest a potentially vulnerable group of students who access and use the mentoring scheme because of the problems they are experiencing.

Although mentoring has become increasingly popular within [United Kingdom] UK higher education, there is little evaluative ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Collings, Rosalyn; Swanson, Vivien; Watkins, Ruth
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: England; Scotland; Wales;
Journal title: Studies in higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Participation; Teaching and learning;

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The economic impact of higher education on the Northern Ireland economy

This study provides an analysis of the economic impact of higher education institutions (HEIs) and their students on the Northern Ireland economy. It was commissioned by the Department for Employment and Learning. The report's primary aim was to assess the economic impact of Northern Ireland's HEIs as businesses and the higher education sector as an industry - in terms of the jobs, output and [gross value added] GVA generated.

This study provides an analysis of the economic impact of higher education institutions (HEIs) and their students on the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Kelly, Ursula; McNicoll, Iain; White, James
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Northern Ireland; Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Economics; Providers of education and training;

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Female academics

This report focusses on the proportion of female academic staff in higher education institutions in Australia, with particular emphasis on senior female academic staff. The report discusses key trends in the employment of female academics from 1988 to 1992.

This report focusses on the proportion of female academic staff in higher education institutions in Australia, with ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Department of Employment, Education and Training. Higher Education Division
Date: 1993
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Report
Series name: DEET higher education series
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Employment;

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A risk and standards based approach to quality assurance in Australia's diverse higher education sector

This paper explains how (Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency) TEQSA's risk-based approach to assuring higher education standards is applied in broad terms to a diverse sector. This explanation is consistent with the revised processes developed by TEQSA in close consultation with the sector over 2013-14. The paper has been developed based on a dialogue between TEQSA and registered higher education providers through their peak bodies. It depicts how TEQSA's risk-based approach to assurance of quality standards is applied in practice to the sector and aims to facilitate a shared understanding of how TEQSA takes into account relevant organisational characteristics. This paper is in three parts, together with an appendix. 'Part one: TEQSA'S overall approach' outlines TEQSA's approach to assuring quality standards, by being satisfied that providers meet and are likely to continue to meet the Threshold Standards. In implementing an approach to arrive at this satisfaction about each registered provider, TEQSA considers three principles which the Act requires it to apply (reflecting risk, proportionality, and necessity). Part one explains how these safeguards require TEQSA to differentiate between providers. 'Part two: An overview of registered providers in the sector' provides descriptive observations about the diverse range and types of registered providers in the sector today. As of mid-2013, there were 173 registered higher education providers, including 37 public Australian universities, three Australian private universities, one University of Specialisation, two overseas universities and 130 other higher education providers. Many of these providers, including some universities, are also registered to provide vocational education and training (VET), and are often referred to as dual sector or multi-sector providers. This profile and the business models employed are evolving as providers respond to market dynamics and new entrants emerge. 'Part three: assuring quality standards in practice' provides further detail about TEQSA's risk-based approach to assuring that providers are meeting the national standards. This covers TEQSA's assessment approaches, including its risk assessment framework and consideration of providers' demonstrated capacity to monitor and manage identified risks. This part also describes how TEQSA's level of confidence in a provider translates into graduated interventions where warranted. To aid understanding, the appendix illustrates TEQSA's application of the framework through a series of hypothetical case studies, making reference to different types of providers, risk profiles, regulatory processes and decisions.

This paper explains how (Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency) TEQSA's risk-based approach to assuring higher ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA)
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Higher education; Quality; Providers of education and training;

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HERDSA news

This journal is published three times a year. Longer articles address topical issues in higher education, balanced by shorter, informal articles and reviews, information about [Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia] HERDSA activities, reports on research in progress, and information on conferences.

This journal is published three times a year. Longer articles address topical issues in higher education, balanced by ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Higher Education Research and Development Society of Australasia (HERDSA)
Date: 1982
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Journal
Subjects: Higher education; Teaching and learning; Providers of education and training;

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LeaD-In: a cultural change model for peer review of teaching in higher education

Peer review of teaching is recognized increasingly as one strategy for academic development even though historically peer review of teaching is often unsupported by policy, action and culture in many Australian universities. Higher education leaders report that academics generally do not engage with peer review of teaching in a systematic or constructive manner, and this paper advances and analyses a conceptual model to highlight conditions and strategies necessary for the implementation of sustainable peer review in higher education institutions. The model highlights leadership, development and implementation, which are critical to the success and formation of a culture of peer review of teaching. The work arises from collaborative research funded by the Office for Learning and Teaching to foster and advance a culture of peer review of teaching across several universities in Australia.

Peer review of teaching is recognized increasingly as one strategy for academic development even though historically peer ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Barnard, A.; Nash, R.; McEvoy, K.;
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Higher education research and development
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Workforce development; Providers of education and training; Higher education

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Making employee training and development a tool for efficiency and effectiveness in Ghanaian universities

Employee training and development are considered critical when it comes to employee efficiency, effectiveness and productivity. The proposition of this paper was that employee training and development could ensure efficiency and effectiveness in university administration. The paper focused on the benefits of training and development, and training methods. It also buttressed some training and development programmes in Ghanaian universities. The paper concluded that the success of every organization, including universities, depends heavily on quality human resources. It therefore follows that there is the need for universities in Ghana to ensure that programmes designed for training and development are holistic in nature to equip employees with the requisite knowledge, attitude, skills and experience for job effectiveness. It is thus recommended that management of universities, especially those in Ghana should make training and development programmes a continuous activity to maintain and appraise employees' skill levels, and motivate them to grow and improve professionally.

Employee training and development are considered critical when it comes to employee efficiency, effectiveness and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Esia-Donkoh, Kweku; Bampoh-Addo, Hagar; Afful, Deborah
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Africa; Ghana
Journal title: Journal of education and practice
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Workforce development; Providers of education and training;

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Professional development online for technical teachers in Vietnam: final report

This project set out to verify the technical competence of a small group of teaching staff in two of Vietnam’s largest providers of Australian TAFE qualifications. The distinguishing feature of this professional development project was the adoption, for the first time, of internet technology using chat, web cam and video conferencing.

This project set out to verify the technical competence of a small group of teaching staff in two of Vietnam’s largest ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Humanagers (Australia)
TAFESA
Date: 2006
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia; Asia;
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Vocational education and training; Workforce development;

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An educational intervention of interprofessional learning in community based health care in Indonesia: what did we learn from the pilot study?

Interprofessional learning (IPL) in community based health care (CBHC) was a pilot model to promote interprofessional education and collaborative practice in Indonesia and to offer the opportunity for medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and public health students to have hands-on experiences in IPL in community settings. The purpose of this article is to describe the IPL program and its implementation in CBHC and to present the students' reaction towards the program. The study was conducted at the State Islamic University in Jakarta, Indonesia in 2012. Sixty-two third-year students, 20 faculty members as tutors, 20 people as standardized patients (SPs) and 15 real patients volunteered and completed this program. Students attended a four-day workshop, a two-day simulation and practiced IPL for two months. The evaluation program applied a mixed-method design and showed that the success of the program was due to designing the program based on theoretical grounds in learning and social domains, applying various teaching methods (small group learning techniques, practice-based learning, and reflective practice) and providing a supportive environment for informal activities. The usefulness of this program was evident from a significant quantifiable improvement in student satisfaction. However, the high rate of student withdrawal from the program was the main issue as the program was not integrated into the curriculum. It needs support from university structures to handle the complexity of professional curricula and the boundaries between faculty/disciplines.

Interprofessional learning (IPL) in community based health care (CBHC) was a pilot model to promote interprofessional ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Tyastuti, Dwi; Onishi, Hirotaka; Ekayanti, Fika;
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Asia; Indonesia
Journal title: Journal of education and practice
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Skills and knowledge; Students;

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The Scottish university level entrepreneurship education initiative: lessons for Ghana in dealing with graduate unemployment

The aim of the study was to investigate entrepreneurship education at the university level in Scotland and lessons Ghana could learn from their experience in solving graduate unemployment. The main data used for the study was primary, collected through interviews with six academics involved in university level entrepreneurship education at four universities in Scotland. [A] qualitative approach was used for this research so as to have a first-hand perception of academics on the entrepreneurship education at the university level. Scottish Enterprise is using entrepreneurship education at the university level as a policy strategy for increasing business birth rate among Scottish university graduates. It clearly emerged from the perspective of academics that entrepreneurship education at the university level cannot significantly lead to business start-ups and therefore cannot be used as a strategy for self-employment among graduates. It became therefore evident that entrepreneurship education cannot be used as a sole strategy for solving unemployment; it can though equip students with some employability skills. The lessons that Ghana can learn from the Scottish experience is that entrepreneurship education could equip students with some enterprise skills (which are needed by employers in Ghana) that would make them employable, thereby contributing to solving graduate unemployment in Ghana.

The aim of the study was to investigate entrepreneurship education at the university level in Scotland and lessons Ghana ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Fosu, Richard; Boateng, Richard
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Africa; Ghana; Europe;
Journal title: Journal of education and practice
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Outcomes; Employment;

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