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The impact and reach of MOOCs: a developing countries' perspective

[Massive] open online courses (MOOCs) are a recent but hugely popular phenomenon in the online learning world. They are hailed by many as a solution for the developing world's lack of access to education because MOOCs can provide learning opportunities to a massive number of learners from anywhere in the world as long as they can access the course through Internet. However, a close consideration of the ability of learners from most developing countries to make use of MOOCs seems to contradict this rhetoric. This paper discusses features of MOOCs and looks at them from a developing countries' perspective to conclude that due to a complicated set of conditions ('access', language, computer literacy, among others) prevailing in developing countries, MOOCs may not be a viable solution for education for a large proportion of people in these areas of the world. The paper further shows the need for more data on the demographics of MOOC participants from developing countries to form a better understanding of MOOCs role in educating people from developing countries.

[Massive] open online courses (MOOCs) are a recent but hugely popular phenomenon in the online learning world. They are ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Liyanagunawardena, Tharindu; Williams, Shirley; Adams, Andrew
Date: 2013
Journal title: eLearning papers
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Economics; Equity;

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Understanding the MOOC trend: the adoption and impact of massive open online courses

This paper addresses three questions: What makes [massive open online courses] MOOCs different from previous online and open education efforts? Will MOOCs generate a positive return on investment for their providers? What can be learnt from early entrants into large-scale online instruction?

This paper addresses three questions: What makes [massive open online courses] MOOCs different from previous online and open ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Attis, David; Koproske, Colin; Miller, Chris
Date: 2012
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Higher education; Teaching and learning; Finance;

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Making real the dream of Education for All through open schooling and open universities in Ghana

Although the last three decades have witnessed astronomical increases in enrollment in basic education, the challenges of access, equity, and quality continue to confront countries, especially in sub-Saharan Africa. In Ghana, education sector policies and reforms have been unable to deal with low transition rates from primary to junior high schools, from junior high schools to senior high schools, and from senior high schools to tertiary level. Children and young students who are unable to continue fail to re-enter because of the absence of complementary or alternative pathways. The old paradigm of physical expansion continues to dominate policies of access. Although several developed and developing countries have used open schooling and open universities to widen access, the success of these programs has been founded on strong policies, commitment of government, and huge investment in technology. Indeed, the future lies with open schooling and open universities.

Although the last three decades have witnessed astronomical increases in enrollment in basic education, the challenges of ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Tagoe, Michael
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Africa; Ghana
Journal title: SAGE open
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Participation; Outcomes; Pathways;

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A remote solution to strengthening workforce capacity [webinar]

In this Australian Council for Adult Literacy webinar (55 minutes), the presenter describes the challenges and benefits of providing professional development support to three tutors teaching foundation learners in school, youth and community contexts in the Northern Territory. The tutors are studying towards a unit within the Address Foundation Skills in Vocational Practice Skill Set - a competency designed to build the capacity of Australian vocational trainers and assessors to address the foundation skills development needs of learners within their vocational practice. This webinar may be of interest to foundation skills tutors, vocational trainers and anyone involved in tutor professional development.

In this Australian Council for Adult Literacy webinar (55 minutes), the presenter describes the challenges and benefits of ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bauer, Ros
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Northern Territory; Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Audiovisual
Subjects: Workforce development; Teaching and learning; Providers of education and training;

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29th Annual Midwest Research-to-Practice Conference in Adult, Continuing, Community and Extension Education [proceedings]

This conference provides a forum for practitioners and researchers to discuss practices, concepts, evaluation, and research studies to improve practice in adult education. Through discussion and collaboration, participants will contribute toward the realization of a more humane and just society through lifelong learning.

This conference provides a forum for practitioners and researchers to discuss practices, concepts, evaluation, and research ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Glowacki-Dudka, Michelle
Conference name: Midwest Research-to-Practice Conference in Adult, Continuing, Community and Extension Education
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: North America; United States; Africa;
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Providers of education and training; Skills and knowledge; Research;

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A feasibility study for a distance education program for Canadian academic credential assessors

Around 550 organizations undertake academic credential assessments in Canada. They employ about 1,200 full-time and 500 part-time assessors, and conduct around 285,000 assessments per year. The aim of this project was to conduct a feasibility study and market research into the possibility of an on-line learning program for academic credential assessors, in particular to: determine the numbers, characteristics, and attitudes of potential users of the program (e.g. regulatory bodies, assessment agencies, educational institutions); seek input on course information from key stakeholders including assessment agencies; and partner with educational institutions to discuss the development of a distance education program specifically designed for existing credential assessors and for those individuals interested in a future career in credential assessment. The establishment of a common training course would help to improve the consistency of practice by academic credential assessors, who are often separated from other assessors and have mostly learned from experience. It will also build a pool of individuals familiar with the basics of foreign credential assessment best practices whose initial on-the-job training would be shortened.

Around 550 organizations undertake academic credential assessments in Canada. They employ about 1,200 full-time and 500 ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Cambridge Professional Development (Firm)
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: North America; Canada
Resource type: Report
Series name: Pan-Canadian quality standards in international academic credential assessment
Subjects: Workforce development; Skills and knowledge; Assessment;

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Policy and barriers related to implementing adult e-learning in Taiwan

The work quality of public servants directly affects a country's administrative performance, and the Taiwan government has recently invested a considerable amount of funds in constructing e-government learning platforms and developing digital courses to provide all public servants with sufficient on-the-job training and enhance the quality of human resources. Therefore, the circumstances under which public servants use e-government learning platforms warrant investigation. In this study, questionnaires were used to collect data for quantitative research, and a theoretical model was created to clarify the impact of 'barrier factors' and 'policy factors' on e-government learning. These factors have been examined inadequately in previous research on the theory of e-learning behaviour. The results presented here show that barrier factors and policy factors strongly influence the willingness of public servants to use e-learning systems, and these factors explain more than 80 per cent of the variance in users' behavioural intention. These results revealed the characteristics of the research participants, and the findings can be used as a reference in future studies and by management agencies responsible for providing e-government learning. Furthermore, these results might facilitate further research on and the practice of adult e-learning.

The work quality of public servants directly affects a country's administrative performance, and the Taiwan government has ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Chung, Hsiu-Ying; Lee, Gwo-Guang; Liu, Shih-Hwa
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Taiwan; Asia
Journal title: Australian journal of adult learning
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Lifelong learning; Adult and community education;

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English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) blended learning project report

Learners seeking to learn English have become a large part of Irish society. Many want to gain an Irish qualification and increasingly do so through local literacy and numeracy services provided by the Education and Training Boards (ETBs). This report describes the findings from a research project carried out in 2013 by the National Adult Literacy Agency (NALA) at the request of the Limerick English for Speakers of Other Languages Partnership (LEP). The research sought to investigate how ESOL learners in the Limerick area were engaging in blended learning by combining local tuition with use of NALA's Write On (an online resource to help learners improve their reading, writing and number skills). The aims of the report are to: document a blended learning approach that meets the needs of ESOL learners; develop a profile of ESOL learners as a means of increasing current knowledge and understanding of them from an age, gender, educational, employment and cultural perspective; and highlight the benefits to learners, providers and organisations of using Write On as part of a blended learning approach to the tuition of ESOL and adult literacy learners. Based on the findings in this report, the following recommendations are made: centres should provide blended learning to ESOL learners to offer increased learning opportunities and expand capacity; centres should develop blended learning approaches that best suit the skills and needs of ESOL learners; where ESOL learners are keen to improve skills outside of the classroom, offerings such as Write On should be promoted; and Write On should be considered as a means of offering accreditation to ESOL learners through recognition of prior learning.

Learners seeking to learn English have become a large part of Irish society. Many want to gain an Irish qualification and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Byrne, Tina; O'Mara, Tom
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Ireland; Europe
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Language; Teaching and learning; Literacy;

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The economics of online postsecondary education: MOOCs, nonselective education, and highly selective education

[The author] considers how online postsecondary education, including massive open online courses (MOOCs), might fit into economically sustainable models of postsecondary education. [The author] contrasts nonselective postsecondary education (NSPE) in which institutions sell fairly standardized educational services in return for upfront payments and highly selective postsecondary education (HSPE) in which institutions invest in students in return for repayments much later in life. The analysis suggests that MOOCs will be financially sustainable substitutes for some NSPE, but there are risks even in these situations. The analysis suggests that MOOCs will be financially sustainable substitutes for only a small share of HSPE and are likely to collapse the economic model that allows HSPE institutions to invest in advanced education and research. [The author] outlines a non-MOOC model of online education that may allow HSPE institutions both to sustain their distinctive activities and to reach a larger number of students.

[The author] considers how online postsecondary education, including massive open online courses (MOOCs), might fit into ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Hoxby, Caroline M.
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Discussion paper
Series name: SIEPR discussion paper
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Finance; Economics;

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MOOCs and VET: working report

This report has been commissioned by the Flexible Learning Advisory Group (FLAG) for submission to the National Senior Officials Committee (NSOC). It seeks to address two key issues: Is there a case for the application of massive open online courses (MOOCs) to the vocational education and training (VET) sector in Australia? What is the role for government in MOOCs for VET?

This report has been commissioned by the Flexible Learning Advisory Group (FLAG) for submission to the National Senior ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Flexible Learning Advisory Group (FLAG)
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Vocational education and training; Technology;

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