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MOOCs: Massive Open Online Courses [January 2014 update]

This paper updates developments in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCS), particularly where they may concern European higher education. MOOCs are growing, and while the highest concentration is in the US, around one third of MOOCs involve European higher education institutions. The European Commission has expressed interest in, and support for, exploring the possibilities MOOCs offer. MOOCs have also developed in other regions where existing education structures are well-developed. These courses are not viewed as a replacement for traditional higher education, but as an adjunct to it through blended learning, lifelong learning and continuing professional education. There are concerns about MOOCs but European institutions see forms of technology-enhanced learning in a positive light.

This paper updates developments in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCS), particularly where they may concern European higher ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Gaebel, Michael
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe
Resource type: Paper
Series name: EUA occasional papers
Subjects: Higher education; Teaching and learning; Technology;

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eLearning in Commonwealth Asia 2013

This study is an attempt to analyse the eLearning scenario in the Commonwealth Asian countries comprising of Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, India, Malaysia, Maldives, Pakistan, Singapore and Sri Lanka. Elearning is a broad term generally used to refer to web-based learning, online learning, blended learning, networked learning, distributed learning, flexible learning, etc. Educational institutions are attracted towards use of [information and communications technology] ICT that provides them with more flexibility and options to reach the students in various ways. The findings indicate that the implementation of eLearning in Commonwealth Asian countries is an increasing trend. Though institutions are facing different challenges, the enthusiasm among the faculty and staff is high. Institutions are integrating ICTs and online technologies in their programmes, which are largely offered in blended mode.

This study is an attempt to analyse the eLearning scenario in the Commonwealth Asian countries comprising of Bangladesh, ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Pulist, S. K.; Mishra, Sanjaya
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Bangladesh; Brunei; India;
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Technology

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The future of e-ducation: the impact of technology and analytics on the education industry

Technology is having an unprecedented impact on education; its future is being shaped by current and emerging technologies that are drastically changing the way in which learning and teaching are experienced. Education is increasingly becoming individualised, customised and more accessible as a result of combining open source technology, the Internet, mobile and multi-faceted technology, virtual learning environments and learning analytic technology. This report reflects on the innovation and the complexities that are currently emerging in education as a result of these technological advancements. Building on this, the report will examine why these technologies are changing the landscape of education and how they will be pivotal in achieving the United Nations' goal for universal education by 2015.

Technology is having an unprecedented impact on education; its future is being shaped by current and emerging technologies ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Bennett, Morgan
Date: 2014
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Technology; Teaching and learning; Innovation;

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VET e-standards for training: recommendations for 2014

The vocational education and training (VET) e-standards were developed by the E-standards for Training business activity under the Australian Flexible Learning Framework, and continue to be maintained under the National VET E-learning Strategy. The e-standards are reviewed and ratified by the E-standards Expert Group (EEG), which is the National Senior Officials Committee (NSOC) endorsed technical standards body for the VET sector. Standards ratified by the EEG are endorsed by the Flexible Learning Advisory Group (FLAG) for implementation by the states and territories and relevant national agencies. This document provides a summary of the VET e-standards. The e-standards recommendations are intended to remove barriers to e-learning, and ensure maximum interoperability of VET systems and content. The e-standards maximise the viability, integrity and portability of e-learning resources and are developed with the aim to ensure that resource development follows internationally accepted specifications. The technologies and applications used to build and deliver the resources ensure the most consistent operation and widest possible use and reuse of those resources.

The vocational education and training (VET) e-standards were developed by the E-standards for Training business activity ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Flexible Learning Advisory Group (FLAG)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Guide
Series name: National VET E-learning Strategy
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Teaching and learning; Technology;

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Increasing access through mobile learning

As the use of mobile devices increases, so is interest in harnessing their power for education and training. Mobile learning (mLearning) is an emerging field that, with the availability of open educational resources and rapid growth of mobile technologies, has immense potential to revolutionise education - in the classroom, in the workplace, and for informal learning, wherever that may be. With mLearning, education becomes accessible and affordable for everyone. This book contributes to the advancement of the mLearning field by presenting comprehensive, up-to-date information about its current state and emerging potential. The book will help educators and trainers in designing, developing and implementing high-quality mLearning curricula, materials and delivery modes that use the latest mobile applications and technologies. The 16 chapters, written by 30 contributors from around the world, address a wide range of topics, from operational practicalities and best practices to challenges and future opportunities. Researchers studying the use of mLearning in education and training, including as a means of supporting lifelong learning, will also find the experiences shared in this book to be of particular interest.

As the use of mobile devices increases, so is interest in harnessing their power for education and training. Mobile learning ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ally, Mohamed; Tsinakos, Avgoustos
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: India; Asia; Singapore;
Resource type: Book
Series name: Perspectives on open and distance learning
Subjects: Technology; Teaching and learning; Equity;

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Using blogging as a teaching/learning tool in a postgraduate teacher education programme at the University of the West Indies (UWI): an activity systems analysis

This paper analyses the impact of blogging on teaching/learning in the English Curriculum unit of a postgraduate teacher education programme that had traditionally been taught face-to-face. Since the 22 teachers of this unit met as a whole group only once a fortnight for most of the semester, blogging was used to introduce course content, to promote reflection and research, and to facilitate teacher interaction. Activity systems criteria such as use of tools, distribution of community learning, interplay of contradictions, and achievement of objectives were used to analyse comments posted to topics on the English Curriculum blog. Two post-blog questionnaires were also administered to gain feedback on interactivity and blog outcomes. Findings suggest that while blogging did promote course content dissemination, it promoted little self-generated research. Teacher interaction was highest on topics of current local concern, while reflection, critical thinking, and risk taking varied with length of teaching experience and individual teacher aptitude. Implications are that in transitioning to online learning in the Caribbean, teacher educators should pay attention to cultural issues and traditions of learning in Caribbean educational systems. With the rapid evolution of elearning resources and ongoing research in mixing traditional and online technologies, a blended learning approach that accommodates a 'flexible learning' philosophy might be best suited for the Caribbean as educators acclimatize to and indigenize technologies.

This paper analyses the impact of blogging on teaching/learning in the English Curriculum unit of a postgraduate teacher ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: James, Cynthia
Date: 2009
Geographic subjects: Central America and the Caribbean; West Indies
Journal title: Caribbean curriculum
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Technology; Higher education;

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Can m- and e-learning support pathways for meaningful vocation in remote communities?

This paper, based on an upcoming [Cooperative Research Centres] CRC for Remote Economic Participation (CRC-REP) research project - 'Pathways to Employment' - will canvas the proposition that mobile technology can be used as an effective vehicle for vocational learning in remote communities. This proposition in itself is not new and indeed there are a number of examples in the literature that demonstrate the possibilities of mobile and emerging digital technologies in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Australia and Indigenous communities elsewhere in the world. However, the application of technologies in vocational learning is often applied to the delivery of mainstream training packages for mainstream employment outcomes. The 'Pathways to Employment' research project will consider pathways from a different starting point than many other research projects, which take as a given, the traditional notion of pathways to employment - typically linear, mainstream oriented and driven - with all the mainstream assumptions that go along with this notion of 'pathway'. This paper foregrounds the research with a consideration of the literature on effective application of digital technologies in vocational learning and the intersection between these technologies, vocational learning and their fit within a pathway. The philosophical underpinnings behind the pathways construct are examined and questioned as to their fit within a remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander context. The paper suggests that the reason the apparently successful applications of digital technologies in remote [vocational education and training] VET programs work is because of their fit with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ontologies, epistemologies and axiologies.

This paper, based on an upcoming [Cooperative Research Centres] CRC for Remote Economic Participation (CRC-REP) research ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Guenther, John; McRae-Williams, Eva; Townsend, Philip
Conference name: Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association Conference
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Demographics; Vocational education and training; Indigenous people;

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Virtual learning tools to support the practical learning requirements of brickwork apprenticeships

Brickwork education in Australia relies on the use of traditional learning techniques, particularly around the theoretical aspects of the trade. This challenges many students who have low literacy and numeracy levels. However Australian students, irrespective of their ability levels, are becoming more and more technology savvy. As a result students are less likely to engage as fully as is needed with paper based teaching methods. Tertiary education institutes in the UK have recognised this issue and have been developing ways to re-engage trade based students in the learning process. A number of UK colleges have developed interactive computer programs that simulate bricklaying techniques and reduce the reliance on the need to read, understand and follow written instructions. The author undertook a study tour of a number of UK colleges to understand how 'virtual bricklaying' learning methods are used to encourage students with low literacy levels to engage fully in the learning process. The Fellowship focused on the need to understand: the benefits of and opportunities to replace traditional teaching methods with technical based learning resources; how to successfully implement virtual learning resources into the trade classroom to realise all potential benefits; and the limitations of virtual learning resources (VLRs) and any lessons that have been learned from the UK experience. The author draws out a number of practical recommendations for relevant stakeholders to support the successful use of 'virtual bricklaying' learning methods within apprenticeship programs.

Brickwork education in Australia relies on the use of traditional learning techniques, particularly around the theoretical ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Clayton, Craig
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Industry; Skills and knowledge; Apprenticeship;

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Criteria for the evaluation of computer software: the development of an evaluation form

Criteria for the evaluation of computer software for computer assisted learning are discussed, and incorporated into an evaluation form. The focus is on aspects of programme design which increases the level of interactivity between the user and the computer. The evaluation form (included as an appendix) can be printed on both sides of a single A3 page, and allows for the comparison of similar programs by the allocation of a score.

Criteria for the evaluation of computer software for computer assisted learning are discussed, and incorporated into an ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Hall, Terry
Date: 1985
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Paper
Subjects: Technology; Evaluation; Research;

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Japan's period of high economic growth and science and technology education: the role of higher education institutions

The intent of this paper is to examine quantitative expansion in technology education during the high economic growth period, and its consequences, with a particular focus on the reinforcement of science and technology at institutions of higher education. Over the 1955-1975 period the number of science and technology students nearly quintupled and the bulk of this growth was the result of three governmental plans to boost student capacity in these fields: (1) 'the 8000-student plan'; (2) 'the 20,000-student plan'; and (3) 'the rapid increase plan'. The first two of these were essentially a part of Japan's manpower strategy aimed at achieving economic growth. However, even amid favourable economic conditions the implementation of these plans did not progress smoothly and in particular it was difficult to regulate the quantitative scale of growth at public (non-national) universities and private universities. For this reason the government was forced to provide massive financial support for these institutions in exchange for cooperation with the plan. Also, while the effort to reinforce science and technology education involved the establishment of a new school format known as 'colleges of technology', most of the quantitative expansion during this period took place in the undergraduate faculties of universities.

The intent of this paper is to examine quantitative expansion in technology education during the high economic growth ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Itoh, Akihiro
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Japan; Asia
Journal title: Japan labor review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Economics; Higher education; Providers of education and training;

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