Search results

Advanced search   My selection

Distance higher education programmes in a digital era: good practice guide

This guide sets out to clarify the key distinctions between distance and contact education provision in South Africa, and to provide guidelines on how general programme accreditation requirements need to be interpreted for a distance education context and the wide variations thereof, including the effective integration of supporting information and communication technologies (ICTs). The guide is divided into eight sections as follows: introduction and background; a conceptual framework for distance education in a digital era; curriculum design, development and delivery for distance education in a digital era; teaching and learning in distance education in a digital era; assessment in distance education in a digital era; partnerships and collaborations for distance education provision in a digital era; managing distance education provision in a digital era; and concluding remarks. These sections include examples of good practice in distance education. There is also a glossary of terms that are useful in the discussion of distance education provision, and a distance education bibliography.

This guide sets out to clarify the key distinctions between distance and contact education provision in South Africa, and to ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Council on Higher Education (South Africa)
South African Institute for Distance Education (SAIDE)
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: South Africa; Africa
Resource type: Guide
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Quality; Higher education;

VITAL Object

Eliminating educational inequality through e-learning: the case of Virtual University of Pakistan

This study aims at examining the role of e-learning in combating the issues of inequality in terms of access and quality in the field of higher education in Pakistan. The education system in Pakistan is mainly characterized by educational disparity. The standard of education is directly proportional to the investment students make in the form of registration and fees. Another important issue is the non-availability of reputed educational institutes in small towns and villages. Unfortunately, very few people from rural areas have access to quality higher education. Virtual University of Pakistan through its distance e-learning mode has come forward to break this trend in social inequality by providing equal educational opportunities to all social classes through its affordable fee structure yet ensuring high standards of teaching.

This study aims at examining the role of e-learning in combating the issues of inequality in terms of access and quality in ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Din, Aisha Muhammad; Jabeen, Sadia
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Pakistan; Asia
Journal title: Open praxis
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Equity; Higher education; Teaching and learning;

VITAL Object

Open access in higher education: strategies for engaging diverse student cohorts

With growth in online education, students gain tertiary qualifications through a mode more suited to their demographics such as work and life balance, learning styles and geographical accessibility. Inevitably this has led to a growth in diversity within student cohorts. The case study described in this paper illustrates strategies based on informed learning design for educating diverse student cohorts in an online program offered by Swinburne University of Technology. The case, an open-access, undergraduate information systems program, attracts mature age students studying while balancing employment and family commitments. The program's open-access facet is the 'no entry requirements' such as prerequisite studies. Hence, many students enter the program via non-traditional pathways bringing significant differences in experience and consequent skill bases. The program's innovative pedagogy encourages students to engage via active learning with tailored assessments, interactive communication via discussion boards and facilitated real-time sessions and formative feedback which include audio components.

With growth in online education, students gain tertiary qualifications through a mode more suited to their demographics such ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Signor, Luisa; Moore, Catherine
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Victoria; Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Open praxis
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Equity; Participation;

VITAL Object

Linking law: practical guidelines for delivering law to rural Victoria using e-learning technologies

These guidelines have arisen from a research project funded by the Telematics Trust and completed by the Centre for Rural Regional Law and Justice (CRRLJ), in the Deakin University School of Law. The guidelines provide information, analysis and practical tips for organisations seeking to use digital technologies to enhance general and professional legal education for people living in remote, rural and regional (RRR) Victoria. In many cases, standard good practice in the use of these technologies is all that is needed to include people living in RRR areas effectively in community and professional education. Many metropolitan participants can also benefit from the availability of low-bandwidth options, recordings, provision for individual online access to videoconferenced events, etc. The document begins with an overview of the landscape for digitally based legal community and professional education in RRR Victoria. The major part of the document then presents the guidelines, highlighting a range of factors reflecting important practical and pedagogical concerns, including access, cost, need for specialist information technology (IT) support, cohort size, and ability to support particular learning designs and types of communication.

These guidelines have arisen from a research project funded by the Telematics Trust and completed by the Centre for Rural ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Dracup, Mary
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Victoria; Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Guide
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Demographics; Technology;

VITAL Object

Patterns of student enrolment and attrition in Australian open access online education: a preliminary case study

Swinburne University of Technology has experienced tremendous growth in open access online learning and as such is typical of the many Australian institutions that have ventured into online tertiary education. While research in online education continues to expand, comparatively little investigates students' enrolment and attrition. This research examines commencing enrolment and associated student withdrawal data, as well as performance scores from eight units forming a marketing major for an open access online undergraduate degree. Since data were collected over a five year period, trends and patterns within a substantial online undergraduate program can be explored. The paper discusses the challenges of analysing enrolment data. Initial findings suggest that retention strategies should be designed according to the stage students are at in their studies. Furthermore, the research informs the prioritisation and development of more effective enrolment and performance data reporting capabilities, which in turn would benefit student management and retention.

Swinburne University of Technology has experienced tremendous growth in open access online learning and as such is typical ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Greenland, Steven J.; Moore, Catherine
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Victoria; Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Open praxis
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Students; Participation;

VITAL Object

Using digital technologies to implement distance education for incarcerated students: a case study from an Australian regional university

As universities become increasingly reliant on the online delivery of courses for distance education, those students without access to the Internet are increasingly marginalised. Among those most marginalised are incarcerated students who are often from low socio-economic status backgrounds and have limited access to resources. This article reports on four projects that incrementally build on each other, three of which are completed, at the University of Southern Queensland that seek to provide access to higher education for incarcerated students. These projects developed a modified version of Moodle, called Stand Alone Moodle (SAM), which doesn't require Internet access, but provides the same level of access and interactivity as regular Moodle. Ebook readers were also used in two of the projects. A description of the projects, a summary of the results and issues is provided. The projects will be extended to deploy Stand Alone Moodle and tablet computers to correctional centres across Australia with a focus on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students.

As universities become increasingly reliant on the online delivery of courses for distance education, those students without ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Farley, Helen Sara; Doyle, Joanne
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Queensland; Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Open praxis
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Disadvantaged; Teaching and learning; Students;

VITAL Object

MOOCs and the funnel of participation

Massive online open courses (MOOCs) are growing substantially in numbers, and also in interest from the educational community. MOOCs offer particular challenges for what is becoming accepted as mainstream practice in learning analytics. Partly for this reason, and partly because of the relative newness of MOOCs as a widespread phenomenon, there is not yet a substantial body of literature on the learning analytics of MOOCs. However, one clear finding is that drop-out/non-completion rates are substantially higher than in more traditional education. This paper explores these issues, and introduces the metaphor of a 'funnel of participation' to reconceptualise the steep drop-off in activity, and the pattern of steeply unequal participation, which appear to be characteristic of MOOCs and similar learning environments.

Massive online open courses (MOOCs) are growing substantially in numbers, and also in interest from the educational ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Clow, Doug
Conference name: International Learning Analytics and Knowledge Conference
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Higher education; Participation; Outcomes;

VITAL Object

Using strategic learning for achieving growth in SMEs

It is important that small and medium sized companies (SMEs) survive/remain successful and achieve growth but they should find new, innovative ways of doing business to allow them to access new markets. Often they have limited resources, managers do not have time to learn new skills but the industry in which they operate has moved on. The use of new technologies for business and learning requires costs and other resources which are often missing. This paper will examine the use of e-learning and social approaches to learning such as communities of practice, social media and mentoring in managerial learning at a strategic level. Finally some examples of ongoing developments in European projects that the authors have worked on are given.

It is important that small and medium sized companies (SMEs) survive/remain successful and achieve growth but they should ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Hamburg, Ileana; O'Brien, Emma
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe
Journal title: Journal of information technology and application in education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Industry; Management; Teaching and learning;

VITAL Object

The potential social, economic and environmental benefits of MOOCs: operational and historical comparisons with a massive 'closed online' course

Massive online open courses (MOOCs) have recently become a much discussed development within higher education. Much of this debate focuses on the philosophical and operational similarities and differences between the types of MOOCs that have emerged to date, the learner completion rates and how they can be sustained. In contrast there has been much less discussion about how such courses do, or do not, fit in with existing higher education policy and practice in terms of the social, economic and environmental benefits. This paper begins to address this issue by comparing and contrasting current MOOCs with one large population [information and communications technology] ICT-enhanced, mostly online Open University UK course presented a decade earlier and how they have both served, or might serve, broader social, economic or environmental objectives. The paper concludes that while MOOCs are forcing a re-conceptualisation of higher education study, much can also be learned from previous and existing large population mainly online courses from open universities.

Massive online open courses (MOOCs) have recently become a much discussed development within higher education. Much of this ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Lane, Andy; Caird, Sally; Weller, Martin
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Journal title: Open praxis
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Technology; Higher education;

VITAL Object

Can MOOCs and existing e-learning efficiency paradigms help reduce college costs?

E-learning enrollments in post-secondary education are growing significantly but the annual cost of tuition continues to increase more than inflation. Does this mean that e-learning cannot reduce costs? After describing some salient details of the tuition cost problem, this article examines four paradigms that have the potential to reduce tuition significantly over the long term, perhaps by half. First, it reviews the effects of free massively open on-line courses (MOOCs) and the new [Massachusetts Institute of Technology] MIT/Harvard Ed X project. Second, it describes the underutilized but highly scalable National Center for Academic Transformation's (NCAT) course redesign paradigm, capable of reducing aggregate administrative and teaching costs by billions annually, and examines problems associated with its wider deployment. Third, Western Governors University's competency-based approach is presented as another way of drastically reducing labor costs while increasing availability of college courses to low income students. Finally, the export/import approach is introduced, in which MOOCs for credit become available (at a fee) beyond the offering institutions, thereby setting up a disruptive, but potentially highly economical reduction in faculty and administrative labor expense.

E-learning enrollments in post-secondary education are growing significantly but the annual cost of tuition continues to ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ruth, Stephen
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Unites States; North America
Journal title: International journal of technology in teaching and learning
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Economics; Higher education; Technology;

VITAL Object