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Conference proceedings: researching work and learning [part 1 of 4]

The fifth International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL5) was held in Cape Town, Republic of South Africa in 2007. The overarching theme was 'Rethinking the 'centre' and the 'margins' in researching work and learning' and it covered the following sub-themes: Learning in formal and informal work contexts; Learning and social development; Re-theorising knowledge; Working and learning in higher or further/vocational education institutions; and Work, learning and policy.

The fifth International Conference on Researching Work and Learning (RWL5) was held in Cape Town, Republic of South Africa ...  Show Full Abstract  

Conference name: International Conference on Research Work and Learning
Date: 2007
Resource type: Conference
Subjects: Research; Employment; Workforce development;

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Learning without teachers?: evidence from a randomized experiment of a mobile phone-based adult education program in Los Angeles

Over 755 million adults worldwide are unable to read and write in any language. Yet the widespread introduction of information and communication technology offers new opportunities to provide standardized distance education to underserved illiterate populations in both developed and developing countries. Using data from a randomized experiment of an innovative mobile phone-based adult education program (Cell-Ed) in Los Angeles, [the authors] find that the Cell-Ed program significantly increased students' basic and broad reading scores, equivalent to a two-four year increase in reading levels over a four-month period. The program also increased participants' self-esteem by seven per cent as compared with the comparison group. These results are robust to correcting for non-random attrition using a variety of non-parametric methods, including using the phase-in design to tighten the Lee bounds. [The] results suggest that there is great scope for using information technology as a means of improving educational skills for illiterate adults.

Over 755 million adults worldwide are unable to read and write in any language. Yet the widespread introduction of ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Ksoll, Christopher; Aker, Jenny C.; Miller, Danielle;
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Resource type: Working paper
Series name: Center for Global Development working paper
Subjects: Adult and community education; Literacy; Technology;

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Educating generation next: screen media use, digital competencies and tertiary education

This article investigates the use of screen media and digital competencies of higher education students in light of the growing focus on new media and e-learning in Australian universities. The authors argue that there is a need to resist the commonplace utopian and dystopian discourses surrounding new media technological innovation, and approach the issue of its potential roles and limitations in higher education settings with due care. The article analyses survey data collected from first-year university students to consider what screen media they currently make use of, how frequently these media are interacted with, and in what settings and for what purposes they are used. The article considers what implications the digital practices and competencies of young adults have for pedagogical programs that aim to engage them in virtual environments.

This article investigates the use of screen media and digital competencies of higher education students in light of the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Cinque, Toija; Brown, Adam
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Journal title: Digital culture and education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Technology; Skills and knowledge; Higher education;

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Competences, learning theories and MOOCs: recent developments in lifelong learning

Our societies have come to be known as knowledge societies in which lifelong learning is becoming increasingly important. In this context, competences have become a much discussed topic. Many documents were published by international organisations (UNESCO, World Bank, European Commission) which enumerated 21st century key competences. The field of learning theories has also experienced advances. Findings from neuroscience have promoted a new understanding of what really happens in the brain when we learn. At the same time, the fact that learning increasingly takes place in virtual communities led George Siemens (2004) to propose connectivism as a learning theory for the digital age. Similarly, Roberto Carneiro (2010) suggested a theory he called generativism which aims at describing collaborative learning with digital technologies and open educational resources. These theories might be better able to describe and explain lifelong learning than classical learning theories. In the field of digital technologies, Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have recently received a great deal of attention. While Siemens suggested connectivist MOOCs (MOOCs) as the ideal platform for connectivist learning, other forms of MOOCs were also developed. These MOOCs have spread at a breath-taking pace in the last few years although it is far from clear to what extent they are based on principles from learning theories and really support learning. These developments will be presented and discussed with respect to their relevance for lifelong learning as an integral part of man's quest for meaning.

Our societies have come to be known as knowledge societies in which lifelong learning is becoming increasingly important. In ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Steffens, Karl
Date: 2015
Journal title: European journal of education: research, development and policy
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Lifelong learning; Teaching and learning; Skills and knowledge;

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Collaborative e-learning in rail: final report

In a geographically dispersed industry such as rail, technology plays an important role in learning. This project sought to obtain an indication of attitudes towards e-learning and capabilities and capacities regarding technology. A portal was developed to allow for sharing of knowledge and communication between rail organisations and across the industry. Overall, the project showed that the future is bright for e-learning in the rail industry.

In a geographically dispersed industry such as rail, technology plays an important role in learning. This project sought to ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Becker, Karen; Fleming, Julie; Jamieson, Kieren;
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Industry; Workforce development;

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E-learning in European higher education institutions: results of a mapping survey conducted in October-December 2013

The present study on e-learning intends to contribute to closing a data gap and to stimulate the discussion on the further development of national and European policies on the issue and to support its systematic institutional take-up. It draws upon a survey conducted by the European University Association between October and December 2013. [Two hundread and forty-nine] answers from higher education institutions, in their majority universities, from 38 European systems ([European Union] EU and wider Europe), were received. While the sample is self-selected, it represents almost one third of [European University Association's] EUA's institutional membership. The survey asked about the type of e-learning institutions use, their experiences in this area and their expectations for the future. It considered blended and online learning in various formats. Given the strong interest in Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), a large section of the report is dedicated to this issue. The survey also posed questions regarding support structures and services, intra-institutional coordination, quality assurance and recognition.

The present study on e-learning intends to contribute to closing a data gap and to stimulate the discussion on the further ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Gaebel, Michael; Kupriyanova, Veronika; Morais, Rita;
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Europe
Resource type: Report
Series name: EUA publications
Subjects: Policy; Higher education; Teaching and learning;

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A performance-oriented approach to e-learning in the workplace

Despite the ever-increasing practice of using e-learning in the workplace, most of the applications perform poorly in motivating employees to learn. Most workplace e-learning applications fail to meet the needs of learners and ultimately fail to serve the organization's quest for success. To solve this problem, we need to examine what workplace e-learning requires and how workplace e-learning systems should be developed in line with those requirements. [The authors] investigated the problem by identifying the fundamental elements of the workplace learning environment including the learner, organization, learning content and social context, and their relationships. [The authors] found that workplace e-learning should align individual and organizational learning needs, connect learning and work performance, and support social interaction among individuals. To achieve this, a performance-oriented approach is proposed in this study. Key performance indicators are utilized to clarify organizational goals, make sense of work context and requests on work performance, and accordingly help employees set up rational learning objectives and enhance their learning process. Using this approach, a prototype system has been developed and a set of experiments have been conducted to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

Despite the ever-increasing practice of using e-learning in the workplace, most of the applications perform poorly in ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Wang, Minhong; Ran, Weijia; Liao, Jian;
Date: 2010
Journal title: Journal of educational technology and society
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Technology; Workforce development;

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E-Learning in the workplace: an annotated bibliography

This report presents an annotated bibliography of 162 papers relating to the use of e-learning in workplaces in New Zealand, Australia, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The objectives are to: provide an overview of the literature on the use of e-learning in the workplace; assist businesses who have implemented or are considering implementing e-learning; assist trainers, government agencies, and institutions in their planning and implementation of e-learning; and extract important findings. The bibliography has been grouped into three categories: (1) introduction to e-learning - literature that is introductory and most likely to be relevant to those considering implementing e-learning in the workplace; (2) further development of e-learning - literature that may assist those who have implemented e-learning but wish to develop it further; and (3) experience with e-learning - literature with more complexity about e-learning programmes and future developments.

This report presents an annotated bibliography of 162 papers relating to the use of e-learning in workplaces in New Zealand, ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Guiney, Peter
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: New Zealand; Australia; Oceania;
Resource type: Report
Series name: Tertiary education occasional paper (New Zealand. Ministry of Education)
Subjects: Teaching and learning; Workforce development; Participation;

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Experiences with blended learning program delivery for apprenticeship trades: a case study

In many trades the demand for training seats has strained the conventional delivery capacity of training providers in Canada. Manitoba, along with other Canadian provinces is experiencing a shortage of skilled tradespersons required to enable current and future economic expansion. Due to the deficiency in the skilled labor force, a community college in Manitoba designed, developed and delivered an alternate model of program delivery for apprenticeship trades education comprised of distributed learning using blended learning methodology. The objective was to realize fruition by employing the use of an online blended delivery model as an alternative to traditional block release training typically comprised of eight-10 weeks of face-to-face instruction at a community college. The delivery objectives focused on creating course content that could be delivered through the Internet to any apprentice regardless of location. The model would permit apprentices living in remote northern regions to remain in their communities to complete their level training as opposed to leaving family and community to complete their training at one of Manitoba's technical colleges. This case study is founded on the requirement in the project Request for Proposal to collect data for continuous improvement purposes for subsequent component development and/or delivery. The data indicates that apprentices identify the opportunity to remain at home in their community to take their level training as the programs greatest strength. The challenges associated with designing, developing and delivering a blended model of apprenticeship training center around institutional engagement, subject matter expert availability and instructor preparedness for using technology for teaching and learning. This case study is significant as the literature is void of empirical data pertaining to an alternative model of apprenticeship training in Canada.

In many trades the demand for training seats has strained the conventional delivery capacity of training providers in ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Vogt, Rosemary
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Canada; North America
Journal title: International journal of higher education
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Apprenticeship; Research; Employment;

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The representation of minority, female, and non-traditional STEM majors in the online environment at community colleges: a nationally representative study

Using data from more than 2,000 community college science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors in the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, this research investigates how ethnicity, gender, non-traditional student risk factors, academic preparation, socio-economic status, and English-as-second-language/citizenship status relate to online course enrollment patterns. Even after controlling for other factors, Blacks and Hispanics (Black and Hispanic men, in particular) were significantly underrepresented in online courses, women were significantly overrepresented, and students with non-traditional student risk factors (delayed enrollment, no high school diploma, part-time enrollment, financially independent, have dependents, single-parent status, and working full-time) were significantly more likely to enroll online. However, although ethnicity, gender, and non-traditional factors were all important predictors for both two- and four-year STEM majors, at community colleges, ethnicity and gender were more important predictors of online enrollment than non-traditional characteristics, which is the opposite pattern observed at four-year colleges.

Using data from more than 2,000 community college science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) majors in the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Wladis, Claire; Hachey, Alyse C.; Conway, Katherine M.
Date: 2015
Geographic subjects: United States; North America
Journal title: Community college review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Students; Gender; Demographics;

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