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Report of the Review of Agricultural and Related Education [McColl report]

The Review of Agricultural and Related Education was commissioned by John Kerrin, the Minister for Primary Industries and Education, to examine the current provision of agricultural and related education, consider its effectiveness and make recommendations on its future development based on the likely future demand. The single most important finding of the review 'is the need for a substantial consolidation and rationalisation of agricultural and related education, if it is to make an effective contribution to the challenges facing Australia's agricultural and related sector'. Recommendations include: national guidelines and institutional cooperation are needed for non-standard and special entry, articulation with TAFE, and credit transfer; institutions offering distance education should continue to review methods of improving access and student retention rates in distance education; state governments should explore ways of enhancing the effectiveness of TAFE sector rural studies; and agricultural and related education should be restructured around a limited number of relatively large faculties within institutions referred to as 'recognised providers'.

The Review of Agricultural and Related Education was commissioned by John Kerrin, the Minister for Primary Industries and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Department of Employment, Education and Training (DEET)
Australia. Department of Primary Industries and Energy
Date: 1991
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Higher education; Providers of education and training; Governance;

VITAL Object

The Forrest review: creating parity

The Australian Government believes there is a real opportunity to make a difference in the lives of Indigenous Australians, and the best way to do that is through real jobs. To address this Andrew Forrest was asked to lead a review of Indigenous training and employment programmes. The review's purpose was to provide recommendations to ensure Indigenous training and employment services are properly targeted and administered to connect unemployed Indigenous people with real and sustainable jobs, especially those that have been pledged to Indigenous people by Australian business. The review considered ways that training and employment services can better link to the commitment of employers to provide further sustainable employment opportunities for Indigenous people and finally end the cycle of entrenched Indigenous disadvantage.

The Australian Government believes there is a real opportunity to make a difference in the lives of Indigenous Australians, ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Forrest, Andrew
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Indigenous people; Evaluation; Policy;

VITAL Object

Technical and further education in Australia

In 2012, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed on a National Partnership Agreement for Skills Reform which will: contribute to the reform of the vocational education and training [VET] system to deliver a productive and highly skilled workforce which contributes to Australia’s economic future and … enables all working age Australians to develop skills and qualifications needed to participate effectively in the labour market. At the heart of these reforms is the adoption of the Commonwealth proposal for a national training entitlement and a more open and competitive training market.

In 2012, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed on a National Partnership Agreement for Skills Reform which ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Parliament. Senate. Education and Employment References Committee
Date: 2014
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Policy; Skills and knowledge;

VITAL Object

Core Skills for Work Developmental Framework

The Core Skills for Work Developmental Framework (the CSfW) describes a set of non-technical skills, knowledge and understandings that underpin successful participation in work. Participation in work could be as an employee, as someone who is self-employed, or as a volunteer. This set of non-technical skills, often referred to as generic or employability skills, contribute to work performance in combination with technical or discipline specific skills and core language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) skills. The CSfW is not a set of standards, nor an assessment tool. It is a framework for conceptualising and articulating skills, knowledge and understandings that underpin work performance over time, and for guiding further development. It is not intended to replace approaches to developing these skills that are already in place, but to provide a common underpinning that is relevant across sectors. The CSfW, as described in this document, is intended to be reviewed after a number of years of use to check whether it would benefit from adjustment or further development.

The Core Skills for Work Developmental Framework (the CSfW) describes a set of non-technical skills, knowledge and ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Department of Industry, Innovation, Climate Change, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIICCSRTE)
Australia. Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR)
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Employment; Performance

VITAL Object

Standards policy framework: improving vocational education and training: the Australian vocational qualifications system

The Standards Policy Framework paper presents the [National Skills Standards Council’s] NSSC’s position on the policy that underpins the reforms required to the current standards for the regulation of vocational education and training. The NSSC is a committee of the Standing Council on Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment (SCOTESE), one of a number of Standing Councils that report to the Council of Australian Governments (COAG). A primary function of the NSSC is the development of national standards for regulation of vocational education and training for approval by SCOTESE. SCOTESE asked that the NSSC, as a priority, undertake a broad ranging review of the standards for the regulation of vocational education and training, focusing on issues of quality. Standards are critical to the appropriate and effective regulation of vocational education and training, ensuring the integrity of qualifications awarded to learners and supporting the achievement of both improved productivity and social outcomes for all Australians. The NSSC’s review has confirmed the need to reform the existing standards for the regulation of vocational education and training. Based on an analysis of available evidence and extensive consultation, the NSSC found that there are many instances of excellent practice in registered training organisations (RTOs) across the country, leading to quality outcomes. However, the NSSC was also made aware of the growing concern that excellent practice is not systemic across vocational education and training, with current delivery highly variable in terms of quality of qualification outcomes. Effective regulation of vocational education and training is critical to the reputation of the sector; the confidence of industry and employers in the value of the qualifications issued by RTOs; and individual learners and employees having the skills to effectively perform in the workforce. This paper presents the NSSC’s Standards Policy Framework which it considers critical to ensuring consistent, high quality vocational education and training and the integrity and reputation of vocational qualifications awarded to learners. Subject to agreement by SCOTESE, the Standards Policy Framework will provide the basis upon which draft regulatory standards are developed for presentation to SCOTESE for endorsement later in 2013.

The Standards Policy Framework paper presents the [National Skills Standards Council’s] NSSC’s position on the policy that ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: National Skills Standards Council (NSSC)
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Policy document
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Quality; Governance;

VITAL Object

A plan for Australian jobs: the Australian Government’s industry and innovation statement

In a changing global economy, Australian firms face many challenges and new opportunities. This plan will help firms meet these challenges head on and take full advantage of opportunities to grow and create new jobs. This will ensure all Australians have the chance to work in more rewarding and high-skilled jobs now and in the future. The plan sets out: what can be done now to get more work for Australian firms; what must be done to ensure that Australian businesses have greater opportunities to win work abroad including in the Asia-Pacific region; and what should be done to ensure that the high skill jobs of the future can be created.

In a changing global economy, Australian firms face many challenges and new opportunities. This plan will help firms meet ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australia. Department of Industry, Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education (DIISRTE)
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia
Resource type: Policy document
Subjects: Industry; Governance; Finance;

VITAL Object

Future focus: 2013 National Workforce Development Strategy

This document is the second national workforce development strategy for Australia. It builds on the work undertaken for ‘Australian workforce futures’, the inaugural strategy published in March 2010. A discussion paper, ‘Australia’s skills and workforce development needs’, was published in July 2012 as part of the consultation process in developing the 2013 strategy. The strategy provides details of how Australia can position itself for growth in the Asian century, in a competitive global environment, where technology and patterns of work are rapidly changing. The Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency (AWPA) developed scenarios to create plausible future worlds for Australia to 2025 to underpin the 2013 strategy. These scenarios have in turn influenced economic modelling of the supply and demand for skills to 2025.

This document is the second national workforce development strategy for Australia. It builds on the work undertaken for ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australian Workforce and Productivity Agency (AWPA)
Date: 2013
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Policy document
Subjects: Workforce development; Skills and knowledge; Labour market;

VITAL Object

Technological change and employment: a report to the Prime Minister by the Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC)

The [Australian Science and Technology Council] ASTEC Technological Change Committee is to maintain a continuing review of the processes and trends in technological change in Australia and elsewhere, and evaluate and report on the direct and indirect effects at the national level including social, economic and technological effects. Technological changes have had and will continue to have profound effects on both the levels and the nature of employment. The present report is an exploratory overview of recently observed effects. It presents for discussion issues, views and conclusions that have been identified or formulated by a variety of commentators from different sections of the community. The report identifies several areas where government action could assist in taking maximum advantage of technological change for the economy and the workforce. These include: support for innovation; education, training and re-training; consultation with employees and unions; and women’s employment. The recommendations made relate to problems that are already on the national agenda or which, with reasonable certainty, will be there in the near future.

The [Australian Science and Technology Council] ASTEC Technological Change Committee is to maintain a continuing review of ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Australian Science and Technology Council (ASTEC)
Date: 1983
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Report
Subjects: Technology; Employment; Outcomes;

VITAL Object

The national co-ordination of technical and further education

A major development within educational systems in a number of western nations since the Second World War has been the establishment by governmnets of special bodies to coordinate tertiary education. In Australia, a complex system has been developed with coordinating agencies being established by governments at both state and federal levels and covering three sectors of tertiary education: universities, colleges of advanced education, and technical and further education (TAFE). While the Commonwealth government has assumed the financial responsibilities for universities and colleges of advanced education, the states still retain not only the constitutional, but also the major financial, responsibility for TAFE. This places the national coordination of TAFE in a unique position. This thesis analyses national coordinating agencies in TAFE in terms of their relationships with the Commonwealth government and groups at state and institutional levels during the period 1973-1981. The analysis led to two major conclusions: (1) that the Commonwealth government established over time a ‘structure of domination’ which ensured that the coordinating agencies’ powers and functions were undertaken in ways which were consonant with the government’s interests; and (2) that groups at state and institutional levels were, in large part, able to thwart the policy initiatives taken by coordinating agencies, and thus effectively limit their ‘exercise of authority’. These led to the following general conclusion that in the performance of their powers and functions, de jure and de facto, national coordinating agencies in TAFE required the support of two groups: those with the power of resource allocation (governments) and those with the power of implementation (groups at state and institutional levels), and that where support from either or both groups was not forthcoming, the coordinating agency was ineffective in performing these functions.

A major development within educational systems in a number of western nations since the Second World War has been the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Batrouney, Trevor
Date: 1985
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Thesis
Subjects: Vocational education and training; Policy; Governance;

VITAL Object

National Foundation Skills Strategy for Adults

In November 2011, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Standing Council on Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment (SCOTESE) agreed to a National Foundation Skills Strategy for Adults. Australian governments have worked in partnership to develop this 10 year strategy built around a shared vision for a productive and inclusive Australia in which adults develop and maintain the foundation skills they need to participate confidently in the modern economy and meet the complex demands of modern life. The strategy focuses on improving outcomes for working age Australians (aged 15-64 years) with a view to moving more people to higher levels, but with a particular focus on those with low levels of foundation skill proficiency. Australian governments have set an aspirational target that by 2022, two thirds of working age Australians will have literacy and numeracy skills at Level 3 or above. For the purpose of the strategy, foundation skills are defined as the combination of: English language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) - listening, speaking, reading, writing, digital literacy and use of mathematical ideas; and employability skills, such as collaboration, problem solving, self-management, learning and information and communication technology (ICT) skills required for participation in modern workplaces and contemporary life. Foundation skills development includes both skills acquisition and the critical application of these skills in multiple environments for multiple purposes. Foundation skills are fundamental to participation in the workplace, the community and in adult education and training.

In November 2011, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Standing Council on Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment ...  Show Full Abstract  

Corporate authors: Council of Australian Governments. Standing Council on Tertiary Education, Skills and Employment (SCOTESE)
Date: 2012
Geographic subjects: Australia; Oceania
Resource type: Policy document
Subjects: Skills and knowledge; Policy; Literacy;

VITAL Object