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Labour market flexibilization and its consequences in Italy

Labor market ‘flexibilization’ or ‘deregulation’ is seen by many as a requirement for economic and occupational growth. As one route towards more flexibility, many European countries increased the so-called atypical or non-standard forms of employment while leaving the regulation of existing employment relations largely unchanged. In Italy, this led to a strong segmentation of the labour market. As employment is the only connection to a series of welfare entitlements, this praxis might lead to strong cleavages in the society. In this paper, we investigate the ongoing process of labour market ‘flexibilization’ and its consequences for individual labour market careers and social inequalities and ask whether the deregulation has fulfilled the expectations attached to it. In detail, we study the entries into the marginal labour market and the consequences for employment careers of these forms of ‘new’ flexible employment. Empirical findings based on Indagine Longitudinale sulle Famiglie Italiane data cast doubts on the effectiveness of the specific form of market deregulation in Italy and confirm strong long-term implications of atypical employment episodes for career chances.

Labor market ‘flexibilization’ or ‘deregulation’ is seen by many as a requirement for economic and occupational growth. As ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Barbieri, Paolo; Scherer, Stefani
Date: 2009
Geographic subjects: Italy; Europe
Journal title: European sociological review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Labour market; Economics; Employment;

VITAL Object

Minority dropout in higher education: a comparison of the United States and Norway using competing risk event history analysis

The objective of this article is to compare college persistence patterns among minority and majority students in universities and colleges in Norway with that of the United States. Despite differences in the educational systems and economic regimes, both countries face the common challenge of ensuring educational equity, especially among students from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds and minority students. Using competing risk event history analysis, this article examines nationally representative samples of students to assess the relative year-to-year risk of dropping out from higher education among minority and majority students. We found that while the US higher education system tends to exacerbate initial socioeconomic inequalities between minority and majority students, there is no difference in the dropout risk among minority and majority students in Norway. Moreover, at the [Bachelor of Arts] BA level, we found that minority students graduate at significantly lower rates than majority students in the United States, even when we control for dropping out. Again, there is no such difference in Norway. This indicates that even though minority students in Norway are also disproportionately from socioeconomically disadvantaged backgrounds, they are encountering fewer obstacles in higher education than minority students in the United States.

The objective of this article is to compare college persistence patterns among minority and majority students in ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Reisel, Liza; Brekke, Idunn
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: United States; North America; Norway;
Journal title: European sociological review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Higher education; Participation; Providers of education and training;

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Educational expansion and its consequences for vertical and horizontal inequalities in access to higher education in West Germany

For scholars of social stratification one of the key questions regarding educational expansion is whether it diminishes or magnifies existing inequalities in educational attainment. The effect of expansion on educational inequality in tertiary education is of particular importance, as tertiary education has become increasingly relevant for labour market prospects and life course opportunities. Our article studies the access to tertiary education of students with different social origins in light of educational expansion in Germany. First, we examine inequalities in access to four vertical alternatives of postsecondary education by means of multinomial regression with national data from four school-leaver surveys from 1983, 1990, 1994, and 1999. Second, for those students who enrol at a tertiary institution, effects of social origin on horizontal choices of fields of study are analysed. Results show that unequal opportunities to access postsecondary and tertiary institutions remain constant at a high level. Likewise, social background effects have not changed over time for the choice of field of study. Thus, students from different social backgrounds did not change their educational strategies irrespective of the ongoing expansion of secondary and tertiary education.

For scholars of social stratification one of the key questions regarding educational expansion is whether it diminishes or ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Reimer, David; Pollak, Reinhard
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: Germany; Europe
Journal title: European sociological review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Equity; Higher education; Labour market;

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The effects of non-employment in early work-life on subsequent employment chances of individuals in the Netherlands

In this article, the effects of non-employment in early work-life on subsequent employment chances of individuals in the Netherlands are examined. A main concern is whether the experience of non-employment in the beginning of the career (permanently) damages a worker’s later employment opportunities (that is, the likelihood of exit out of and re-entry into employment). The empirical analysis is based on five retrospective life-history surveys collected in the Netherlands in the period 1992-2003, with full information on employment histories of individuals. The analytic sample consists of 7,761 respondents, who left education since the 1950s. The results of the empirical analysis first of all show that the duration of non-employment in the first three years after leaving education (and not the number of non-employment spells in that period) increases the likelihood of exiting employment in the subsequent time period (up until 15 years after leaving education). This finding holds for both men and women. Second, a negative duration effect of non-employment on the likelihood of re-entering employment after a job loss is found, but for men only. These results imply that non-employment in early work-life indeed has a scarring effect on subsequent employment chances of individuals in the Dutch labour market.

In this article, the effects of non-employment in early work-life on subsequent employment chances of individuals in the ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Luijkx, Ruud; Wolbers, Maarten H. J.
Date: 2009
Geographic subjects: Netherlands; Europe
Journal title: European sociological review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Labour market; Employment; Research

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Has increased women's educational attainment led to greater earnings inequality in the United Kingdom?: a multivariate decomposition analysis

It is widely believed that the growth in women's educational attainment and their increasing labour force participation, together with educational homogamy, will lead to greater inequality between households in their earnings. In this article, we use data from the United Kingdom to test that assertion. We use a new method of decomposing the change in household earnings inequality, and this allows us to identify effects associated with women's increasing educational attainment and consequential changes in their propensity to marry, in educational assortative mating and in labour-force participation. We find that changes in women's education and their behavioural consequences account for little if any of the growth in earnings inequality between households in the United Kingdom during the closing decades of the 20th century.

It is widely believed that the growth in women's educational attainment and their increasing labour force participation, ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Breen, Richard; Salazar, Leire
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Journal title: European sociological review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Outcomes; Qualifications; Labour market;

VITAL Object