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Fixed-term contracts at labour market entry in West Germany: implications for job search and first job quality

Fixed-term contracts have become very relevant in the transition from school to work. Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (GSOEP) for the period 1984-2006, this article analyses differences in the timing of receiving a fixed-term contract or a permanent contract throughout the duration of first-job search and whether fixed-term contracts are associated with lower initial wages. Competing risk duration models reveal that school leavers initially receive more often permanent contracts but that a certain proportion also accepts temporary jobs. For transitions to both fixed-term and permanent contracts, we find that the longer the time spent searching for a job, the lower the transition probability to a job. The negative duration dependence effect is even more pronounced for fixed-term employment. Comparing labour market entrants with similar individual and job characteristics using propensity score matching techniques show that entrants earn significantly less in fixed-term jobs compared to permanent employment. Wage penalties are slightly larger for those who actually choose fixed-term contracts in their first job, whereas randomly allocated job entrants would suffer lower wage losses. Especially graduates from tertiary education suffer high initial wage losses in fixed-term contracts.

Fixed-term contracts have become very relevant in the transition from school to work. Using data from the German ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Gebel, Michael
Date: 2009
Geographic subjects: Germany; Europe
Journal title: European sociological review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Employment; Higher education; Income;

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Has increased women's educational attainment led to greater earnings inequality in the United Kingdom?: a multivariate decomposition analysis

It is widely believed that the growth in women's educational attainment and their increasing labour force participation, together with educational homogamy, will lead to greater inequality between households in their earnings. In this article, we use data from the United Kingdom to test that assertion. We use a new method of decomposing the change in household earnings inequality, and this allows us to identify effects associated with women's increasing educational attainment and consequential changes in their propensity to marry, in educational assortative mating and in labour-force participation. We find that changes in women's education and their behavioural consequences account for little if any of the growth in earnings inequality between households in the United Kingdom during the closing decades of the 20th century.

It is widely believed that the growth in women's educational attainment and their increasing labour force participation, ...  Show Full Abstract  

Authors: Breen, Richard; Salazar, Leire
Date: 2010
Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe
Journal title: European sociological review
Resource type: Article
Subjects: Outcomes; Qualifications; Labour market;

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