Factors influencing college decision-making for first-generation Appalachian students

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Permanent URL for this page: http://hdl.voced.edu.au/10707/294980.


Author: Wood, Kristy Lynn

Abstract:

This investigation determined the degree of importance for selected personal-psychological, academic, peer, financial, and family factors influencing the decision to attend college by first-generation, Appalachian (FGA) sophomore students. Outcomes were further related to the degree of academic and social integration in college and the likelihood of participants returning (persisting) to the next term or year. Results found that personal-psychological factors were by far the most important influences for ALL respondents and especially for first-generation (FGA) students. Financial factors were also important influences, though differences were noted among the groupings. Overall, academic, peer, and family factors were not important influences. Participants reported modest levels of academic and social integration in their college settings and FGA participants reported even lesser degrees of integration compared to ALL or OTHER groupings. However, significant differences were found among the groupings for several social integration descriptors. Large percentages of ALL (83 per cent) and FGA (87 per cent) indicated to be very likely to return to college next term/year. No academic or social integration descriptors were significantly related to persistence, with the exception of 'spend time with friends on campus' for FGA respondents.

Excerpts from published abstract.

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This investigation determined the degree of importance for selected personal-psychological, academic, peer, financial, and family factors influencing the decision to attend college by first-generation, Appalachian (FGA) sophomore students. Outcomes were further related to the degree of academic and social integration in college and the likelihood of participants returning (persisting) to the next term or year. Results found that personal-psychological factors were by far the most important influences for ALL respondents and especially for first-generation (FGA) students. Financial ...  [+] Show more

Subjects: Students; Participation; Higher education; Culture and society; Finance

Keywords: Student interests; Decision making; Transition from secondary to further education and training; Academic persistence; Family; Financial aspects

Geographic subjects: United States; North America

Published: Huntington, West Virginia: Marshall University, 2012

Physical description: x, 150 p.

Access item:
http://mds.marshall.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1226&context=etd

Notes:
On cover: Dissertation submitted to the Graduate College of Marshall University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Education in Curriculum and Instruction

Resource type: Thesis

Call Number:
TD/TNC 115.1002



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