Outbound student exchange at Australian and New Zealand universities: the effects of pre-departure decision-making, in-country experiences and post-sojourn outcomes

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Permanent URL for this page: http://hdl.voced.edu.au/10707/239373.


Author: Daly, Amanda J.

Abstract:

There is increasing student mobility around the world and a growing focus on transnational education. Until a decade ago in Australia and New Zealand the emphasis was on attracting international students to be full-fee paying (FFP) enrolments. Consequently, much of the research has focused on issues relating to the psychosocial and sociocultural adjustment, and learning and teaching needs of FFP international students. Recently, there has been a growing field of work from the US and Europe examining outbound student mobility programs including cultural and language tours, study abroad and student exchange. Although student exchange is purported to be an effective method for increasing the intercultural competence of domestic students to perform in the global marketplace, there is a paucity of research empirically examining the student exchange experience. Thus, this thesis examined student exchange in the Australian and New Zealand context. This research project investigated the processes and outcomes of the student exchange experience for Australian and New Zealand university students. This thesis examined how many students participate in exchange programs; who these students are; why they participate and what impact this experience has in terms of intercultural competencies and international orientation.

This research project is unique as it represents the first detailed national study of student exchange in both Australia and New Zealand. Reflecting the longitudinal study in this thesis, a model was developed spanning the three phases of the exchange sojourn: pre-departure, in-country, and post-exchange. Multiple methodologies were adopted across the four studies in this thesis in order to understand the factors at all phases of the exchange experience that may impact upon the outcomes of the sojourn. The model and the results of these studies provide universities with a better understanding of how to manage their exchange programs.

Excerpts from published abstract.

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There is increasing student mobility around the world and a growing focus on transnational education. Until a decade ago in Australia and New Zealand the emphasis was on attracting international students to be full-fee paying (FFP) enrolments. Consequently, much of the research has focused on issues relating to the psychosocial and sociocultural adjustment, and learning and teaching needs of FFP international students. Recently, there has been a growing field of work from the US and Europe examining outbound student mobility programs including cultural and language tours, study abroad ...  [+] Show more

Subjects: International education; Higher education; Teaching and learning; Outcomes; Skills and knowledge; Participation; Culture and society

Keywords: Student exchange; Decision making; Competence; Cultural awareness

Geographic subjects: Oceania; Australia; New Zealand; Canada; North America

Published: [Mt Gravatt, Queensland]: Griffith University, 2007

Physical description: xvi, 295 p.

Access item:
http://eprints.utas.edu.au/6736/

Notes:
On cover: Submitted as a dissertation for the award of Doctor of Philosophy

Resource type: Thesis

Call Number:
TD/TNC 111.194



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