Extending conceptualisations of the diversity and value of extra-curricular activities a cultural capital approach to graduate outcomes: final report

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Author: Clegg, Sue; Stevenson, Jacqueline; Willott, John

Abstract:

This report presents the findings from the research project Extending conceptualisations of the diversity and value of extra-curricular activities: a cultural capital approach to graduate outcomes. Very little research has specifically addressed the issue of the contribution of extra-curricular activities (ECA) to graduate outcomes. Moreover, there is a striking lack of clarity about what is meant by 'ECA' when the term is used in a policy context or indeed in the learning and teaching literature. It appears that there is a 'common sense' default position in which sporting, arts, cultural activities, and volunteering might be assumed to be ECA. With changing student profiles we know, however, that many students are engaged in paid employment; that some students have caring and family responsibilities; that some students will continue traditional religious and cultural affiliations; and that some of these activities will take place in the context of them continuing to live in their family home. Rather than proposing our own definition at the outset, we have taken these definitional issues as a research problem to be investigated. Throughout the report we will distinguish between ECA as defined implicitly or in the unprompted responses of our respondents, and a definition based on the full range of activities that students might be engaged in outside their academic work, which includes paid employment, caring, faith, and political activity in addition to sport, arts and culture, and volunteering.

Excerpt from introduction.

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This report presents the findings from the research project Extending conceptualisations of the diversity and value of extra-curricular activities: a cultural capital approach to graduate outcomes. Very little research has specifically addressed the issue of the contribution of extra-curricular activities (ECA) to graduate outcomes. Moreover, there is a striking lack of clarity about what is meant by 'ECA' when the term is used in a policy context or indeed in the learning and teaching literature. It appears that there is a 'common sense' default position in which ...  [+] Show more

Subjects: Higher education; Research; Culture and society; Students; Outcomes; Employment

Keywords: Diversity; Graduates

Geographic subjects: Great Britain; Europe

Published: York, England: Higher Education Academy, [2011?]

Physical description: 113 p.

Access item:
http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/assets/documents/EvidenceNet/Clegg_Final_Report.pdf

Resource type: Report

Call Number:
TD/TNC 107.882



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