Effectiveness of fully online courses for college students: response to a Department of Education meta-analysis

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Permanent URL for this page: http://hdl.voced.edu.au/10707/175102.


Author: Jaggars, Shanna Smith; Bailey, Thomas R.

Corporate author:
Columbia University. Teachers College. Community College Research Center (CCRC)

Abstract:

Proponents of postsecondary online education were recently buoyed by a meta-analysis sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education suggesting that, in many cases, student learning outcomes in online courses are superior to those in traditional face-to-face courses. This finding does not hold, however, for the studies included in the meta-analysis that pertain to fully online, semester-length college courses; among these studies, there is no trend in favor of the online course mode. What is more, these studies consider courses that were taken by relatively well-prepared university students, so their results may not generalize to traditionally underserved populations. Therefore, while advocates argue that online learning is a promising means to increase access to college and to improve student progression through higher education programs, the Department of Education report does not present evidence that fully online delivery produces superior learning outcomes for typical college courses, particularly among low-income and academically underprepared students. Indeed some evidence beyond the meta-analysis suggests that, without additional supports, online learning may even undercut progression among low-income and academically underprepared students.

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Proponents of postsecondary online education were recently buoyed by a meta-analysis sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education suggesting that, in many cases, student learning outcomes in online courses are superior to those in traditional face-to-face courses. This finding does not hold, however, for the studies included in the meta-analysis that pertain to fully online, semester-length college courses; among these studies, there is no trend in favor of the online course mode. What is more, these studies consider courses that were taken by relatively well-prepared university ...  [+] Show more

Subjects: Higher education; Teaching and learning; Students; Disadvantaged; Outcomes

Keywords: E-learning; Online learning; Learning support; Low income group; Educationally disadvantaged; Academic achievement

Geographic subjects: United States; North America

Published: New York, New York: CCRC, 2010

Physical description: 16 p.

Access item:
http://ccrc.tc.columbia.edu/publications/effectiveness-fully-online-courses.html

Statement of responsibility: Shanna Smith Jaggars and Thomas Bailey

Resource type: Paper

Call Number:
TD/TNC 105.690



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